Johnson, Ginger - Cute and Cuddly Canines

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Ginger Johnson
  • Owners: Johnson, Ginger
  • Business name: Cute and Cuddly Canines
  • Address: 201 Little River 47
  • City, State Zip: Ashdown, AR 71822
  • Year: 2004
  • USDA License: 71-A-0797
  • USDA Inspector: Donnovan Fox, ACI
  • USDA Inspections: 2004-01-12
  • Date of CAPS Investigation: 2004-08-22


Approximately 900 dogs and 40 puppies. Breeds: Shih Tzus, Poodles, Yorkshire Terriers, Maltese, Beagles, West Highland Terriers, Schnauzers, Pekingese, Italian Greyhounds, Chihuahuas

Ginger Johnson’s facility had a main kennel and breeding area, a kennel for puppies, and a section of outdoor pens.

Main Kennel
One entire length of the main kennel had outdoor cages that linked to indoor cages. There were about 400 cages on this wall that were stacked in three layers. All of the cages were about 18 inches tall and wide. They were made with wooden beams at the corners and had treated-wire sides, tops, and floorings.

Most of the dogs weighing ten or more pounds were placed two to a cage, while dogs less than ten pounds were placed three to a cage. Several cages each contained four dogs about 10 inches long (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures, Space). Opposite the indoor cages were cages with nursing mothers, approximately 10 to 15 inches in length, with four to six puppies (3.1(c)(1)(i) and (ii)-Primary enclosures, Space).

Two doors were open on each of end of the building. One end had a fan about four feet in diameter blowing air into the building. There was no other source of ventilation in the building, and a strong ammonia odor filled the structure (3.3(b)-Ventilation). With the lights off in the building, the entire building was pitch black; yet, with the lights on, light was dim at best in the inside cages (3.3(c)-Lighting).

Outdoor pens
Behind this building (on the side away from the Johnson house) were sets of outdoor enclosures. Unless noted otherwise, these pens had six-foot-high chain link walls with a two-foot-wide doorway on one side, red tarps laid down for flooring, and a self-feeder made of PVC piping about six feet long. The dispensing ends of these pipes rested on metal dishes on the pen floor. They had not been placed in a manner to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding.)

One pen about five feet wide and ten feet long contained two adult Airedale Terriers and a plastic, igloo-type dog house about three feet tall and about three feet wide. A metal and a plastic water dish were on the pen flooring. The center of a red tarp over the top of the pen sank more than a foot into the pen from the weight of water in it (3.1(f)-Drainage).

Another white plastic pen about ten feet wide and ten feet long contained three adult Schnauzers with matted fur (2.40-Vet Care). A plastic water dish on the flooring of the pen was filled with yellowish-green water (3.10-Watering). A red tarp about three feet wide and ten feet long was stretched over the top of the pen. The flooring was stained brown in several areas, some patches more than a foot in diameter (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces).

A third pen about five feet wide and ten feet long contained two adult Italian Greyhounds. The pen had no tarp on top or windbreaks on its sides, had a plastic water container on the ground, and a tarp flooring stained brown in several areas, including one spot about 18 inches in diameter with standing water in it (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces) (3.1(f)- Drainage). This pen also had a plastic dog house.

Another pen about ten feet wide and ten feet long contained three adult Schnauzers with matted fur (2.40-Vet Care). The pen had two plastic dog houses. The flooring of the pen was stained brown in several areas, including some spots more than 18 inches in diameter (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces). The pen had a red tarp about five feet wide and 10 feet long covering it.

A fifth pen about ten feet wide and ten feet long contained three adult Beagles. This pen, too, had a plastic dog house. The flooring of the pen had thick stains that were in some places half an inch thick and looked and smelled like feces (3.11(a)-Cleaning of Primary Enclosures). Two plastic water dishes were placed on the ground of the pen. A tarp about ten feet long and eight feet wide was over the top of the pen. One corner of the tarp was hanging about two feet down into the pen itself (3.1(a)-Structure; construction)

A sixth pen about ten feet wide and ten feet long contained two Schnauzers with matted fur (2.40-Vet Care). The pen had six-foot-tall chain link walls on three sides. The fourth wall was galvanized wire with a three-foot-wide chain link doorway. The pen contained a single plastic dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and about three feet long – not of sufficient size to allow both Schnauzers to lie in it in a normal manner or turn about freely in it at the same time (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements). A plastic water dish was lying on the tarp flooring of the pen and had yellowish-green water in it (3.10-Watering), and a smaller back plastic dish was also lying on the pen flooring. A red tarp about ten feet long and eight feet wide was covering the top of the pen, though one corner of the tarp was hanging down over two feet into the pen (3.1(a)-Structure).

Another housed three adult Schnauzers with matted fur (2.40-Vet Care). Rusty metal beams ran along the bottom of the wire cages (3.1(c)(1)(i)-Surfaces). Tarps covered three walls and the top of the pen, and one ten foot wall was half-covered by a tarp. There was a plastic water dish in the pen that was filled with yellowish-green water (3.10-Watering). The pen contained also contained a single plastic dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide and three feet long, which was not large enough to allow all of the Schnauzers in the pen to lie in a normal manner or turn about freely together (3.4(b)-Shelter from the Elements).

An eighth pen housed four adult Italian Greyhounds. Two plastic water dishes, one with yellowish-green water, were on the red tarp flooring (3.10-Watering). This pen also included a plastic dog house. Tarps ran the length and width of one five foot wall. A tarp on the top of the pen hung down about four feet into the pen from one corner (3.1(a)-Structure; construction).

The galvanized wire wall of the eighth pen served as a common wall for another five-foot-wide and ten-foot-long pen housing two adult Schnauzers. The other three walls of the pen were six-foot-tall chain link wire. A yellow water bucket filled with brown water was on the pen’s tarp flooring (3.10-Watering). No tarps at all were attached to the pen, though there was a plastic dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long in the pen.

A ninth pen housed two adult West Highland Terriers. The red tarp flooring was stained brown in several areas and smelled of feces (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces). There was an empty metal water dish in the pen, as well as a plastic dish filled with yellowish-brown water (3.10-Watering). A tarp ran half the length of the top of the pen (five feet long and wide) and along a five-foot wall of the pen. This pen contained another plastic doghouse.

Four pens, each containing two Schnauzers, were adjacent to each other in a square formation. Each pen was about ten feet wide and ten feet long. Pens contained large amounts of feces which appeared to have not been cleaned up in more than a day (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). Further, tarp flooring exhibited large brown stains (some more than a foot in diameter) (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces). Two of these pens each had two puddles of standing water about a foot in diameter and one had a puddle of water about ten inches in diameter (3.1(f)-Drainage). Each pen also had a plastic dog house. Plastic water dishes were filled with yellowish-green water (3.10-Watering). Two of the pens had tarps attached to their ceilings. They were hanging down the pen walls and not covering the tops of the pens (3.1(a)-Structure; construction).

One of these pens housed two adult West Highland Terriers, and the other housed four adult Brussels Griffons. Each of these pens contained a plastic dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long. The dog house in the Brussels Griffon pen was not large enough to allow all of the dogs inside to lie down in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements). A plastic water dish in the West Highland Terrier pen contained dirty brown water (3.10-Watering). Both pens had large brown stains on the tarp flooring (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces) and a quantity of feces signaling each pen had not been cleaned in more than a day (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Another, similar set of four pens was located next to the pens described above and contained similar dog houses. Two pens each housed two adult Schnauzers, one housed two adult West Highland Terriers, and another housed two adult Airedale Terriers. Flooring was covered with brown stains (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces) and enough feces to suggest it had gone more than a day since cleaning (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

The pen containing the Airedale Terriers had a tarp about ten feet long and five feet wide over it with one corner hanging more than a foot into the pen (3.1(a)-Structure; construction). Both of the pens containing Schnauzers had the same size tarps. One of these tarps had an unattached corner hanging more than a foot into the pen (3.1(a)-Structure; construction). There were two unsecured two-by-four wooden boards on top of the tarp to hold the tarp in place (3.1(a)-Structure; construction). The tarp of the other pen was completely unattached to one wall and hanging down into the pen (3.1(a)-Structure; construction). One Schnauzer pen contained a metal water dish filled with brown water (3.10-Watering). The rim of the bowl had jagged edges all the way around (3.1(c)(1)(ii)-Surfaces).

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