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Saturday, 28 November 2009 19:00

Action Alert – Oklahoma

Oklahoma is the second highest puppy producing state in the US, following only Missouri.

Additionally, while USDA regulates breeders that sell wholesale, we are the only high volume breeder state to have no state regulations to cover those who are not required to be licensed by USDA. The AKC and others want to keep it that way, but it is not for the benefit of the animals.

A deliberate misinformation campaign is being waged against current legislation aimed at regulating high volume breeding facilities in Oklahoma.  Low end breeders, fraudulent rescue organizations and even AKC have teamed up to frighten high quality breeders, rescues and others about the bill, which would simply mandate USDA standards as a minimum level of care for facilities not currently regulated by USDA.

The AKC reaps massive rewards from the totally unrestricted puppy trade in Oklahoma, and have played on misinformation and distortions of the language including claiming that the bill prohibits transport to dog shows. IT DOES NOT and they know it.

Good people are falling for the lies; this campaign may indeed destroy the chances for the first ever legislation aimed at regulating the wildcat "puppy trade" in Oklahoma.

Due to the lack of regualtions, in Oklahoma, dogs may legally be kept in tiny cages (under USDA size), without light and venitilation, vaccination records are not required; puppies as young as four weeks are sold. Unless there is animal cruelty involving the withholding of food, water or emergency veterinary treatment to the point of mortal danger, it is not possible for an officer to intervene in a puppy mill operation in Oklahoma; dogs legally languish in filth in Oklahoma for their entire lives.

Those who oppose this bill benefit financially from the lack of regulations.

The proposed legislation, HB 1332, would simply mandate USDA standards as a minimum for all facilities selling, trading or adopting out over 25 dogs, cats, kittens or puppies in a year.  This means that if your dogs are housed in cages instead of in your home, the cages must be at least six inches longer than the dog and must have 6 inches of headroom.  Most people strive to do better than this, this law is designed only to eliminate the most substandard.

It is an outrage that any legitimate rescue organization would oppose standards to give dogs that are in the hands of bad people a few inches more, and yes-that is what this is over.

Those circulating the rumors have taken advantage of the fact that many people are not familiar with legislative language.  One anti-animal welfare website in Pennsylvania cut and pasted the bill to alter the language, inserted extra words and circulated that in order to get opposition.  One circulated the rumor that it would become illegal to keep dogs in the house.  Our legislators have been overwhelmed by opposition based on false information.

Please e-mail Dr Lee Denney and simply thank her for taking the courageous step of proposing the first ever legislation to stop the unregulated puppy trade in Oklahoma and please let our house leadership know that Oklahoma's puppy trade is a disgrace.

Thank you to Lee Denney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. " data-mce-href="mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. >,

Please communicate this simple message on the tragedy of the unregulated puppy trade to our house leadership:

Dear__________________

 
The tragedies of the unregulated puppy trade in Oklahoma are well known across the nation.  The simple standards mandated under HB 1332 are upheld in all states that have high volume breeding facilities in large numbers and should be in place in Oklahoma.

A campaign of misinformation has been circulated by those with a financial stake in this issue, and they are doing so at the expense of Oklahoma's image and taxpayers as this is an enormous, unregulated cash-only industry. No reputable breeder or rescue would have any reason to oppose this bill.

Please support common sense and vote for HB 1332.

Sincerely,

 
OK Speaker of the House;  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. " data-mce-href="mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Speaker Pro Tempore This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. " data-mce-href="mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Democratic Minority Leader This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. " data-mce-href="mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Democratic Floor Leader This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. " data-mce-href="mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please tell the AKC that you are disappointed that USDA standards are so problematic to them that they are using distortions to garner opposition to this bill.

 
Contact them at

AKC, 260 Madison Aveniue, 4th floor, New York, NY 10016 phone: (212) 696-8200

and

AKC, 8051 Arco Corporate Drive, Suite 100, Raleigh, NC 27617-3390

Telephone: 919.233.9767
Published in CAPS News
This article discusses the USDA's Office of Inspector General Report based on a two year OIG audit and investigation, which was prompted by a two hour meeting CAPS had with them in May 2006 in which we presented investigation reports, video footage and photographs of USDA licensed puppy mill breeders and brokers. Our reports, which cite AWA violations, compared our findings to those of the inspectors.

Publication/Event date: 2011-11-28

Publication name: Tulsa World

URL for more info: http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=336&;articleid=20111128_16_A1_AUSDep413738

Summary:
A 2010 U.S. Department of Agriculture report featuring disturbing images from Oklahoma kennels shows the need for state regulation of commercial dog breeders, the head of the state board in charge of that process says.

"It's atrocious," said Oklahoma Commercial Pet Breeders Board Chairman Angel Soriano. "How can we say we don't need legislation in this area?"

But an attorney for dog breeders who are challenging the constitutionality of the state's rules has a different take on the report.

Read more from this Tulsa World article at http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=336&;articleid=20111128_16_A1_AUSDep413738
Published in CAPS News
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 21:14

Yoder, Allen and Mary

Breeds: Golden Retrievers, Huskies, Shih Tzu, Dachshunds, Yorkshire Terriers, American Eskimos

On the premises at the time of investigation: approximately 100 dogs and 20 puppies.

This facility included a building that housed whelping dogs and their puppies and small-breed breeders. It also had outdoor runs with whelping boxes and outdoor breeder pens.

Kennel building

The kennel building had cages on two sides. Along each of these walls, one row of cages was set above another, with ten cages per row. The cages were made of treated wire, and there was plastic sheeting below each row of cages to catch feces and debris. These cages had plastic self-feeders and automatic water spigots. Metal doggie doors allowed access to outdoor cages. Each cage housed two small-breed dogs, or a whelping mother and puppies. Two cages each contained two Shih Tzus, all of which had thick mats in their fur, particularly on their undersides (2.40-Vet care).

Outdoor pens

There were about ten outdoor breeder pens, which were large areas of dirt surrounded by wire walls. Each contained a wooden dog house lacking a windbreak (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements) and holding three Huskies or Golden Retrievers.

Husky whelping pens

Two of the outdoor whelping pens consisted of wire runs with plastic whelping boxes accessible via doggie doors. The boxes were about three feet wide and high and four feet long. Each housed a nursing Husky and six to seven puppies.

The mothers were each about four feet long from the tip of the nose to the base of the tail and were unable to lie down without being in contact with the box walls (3.6(a)(2)(xi)-Primary enclosures).

The boxes were in complete darkness, visible only because Allen lifted the plastic ceiling off the boxes to view inside (3.2(c)-Lighting). The plastic floorings and carpet sections over them were covered in fecal stains (3.1(c)(1)(3)-Surfaces).

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 19:24

Pease, Dan, Hattie & Kim - Rockin P Kennel

Breeds: Shih Tzu, Chihuahuas, Dachshunds, Miniature Poodles

On the premises at the time of investigation: approximately 110 dogs, and an undetermined number of puppies.

Pease’s kennel consisted of a whelping building and several rows of outdoor breeder pens.

Whelping building

The whelping building was a trailer with indoor/outdoor whelping and breeder cages made of plastic and treated wire. These cages were arranged in two layers along each of two sides of the trailer. Most of the cages housed a whelping mother and puppies, while the others housed pairs of breeders. The cages had metal dog doors connecting the indoor and outdoor pens, were elevated over plastic sheeting installed to catch feces and debris, and had water dishes and automatic feeders in the indoor pens. There were about 40 cages in this building.

Poodle cage

The entrance to the building opened to a storage room containing kennel food, supplies, and veterinary medicine. While the owner did not allow access into this room, it was evident there was a single miniature Poodle in an elevated, treated-wire cage that measured about 2.5 feet in width, height, and length. The Poodle was nearly two feet long from the tip of the nose to the base of the tail and had thick mats covering her body (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures; (2.40-Vet care).

This dog’s head was constantly tilted to the left, a condition that Pease said she didn’t understand but hoped would go away on its own after the Poodle was placed with other dogs (2.40-Vet care).

A raised water dish was attached to a wire wall, and a metal food dish was placed on the wire flooring in a manner that did not minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding).

There was several days’ accumulation of feces on newspaper covering a plastic sheet under the flooring (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

On top of the Poodle’s cage were two empty, stacked cages. The middle cage had several days’ accumulation of feces on newspaper covering a plastic sheet under its wire flooring (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Outdoor pens

The outdoor pens were arranged in four rows next to each other with about eight pens per row. Each pen had wire walls, a layer of rocks covering the ground, and food and water dishes placed on the rocks. Tarps attached to the walls served as windbreaks, and metal roofs covered each row of pens.

The food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta or pests (3.9(b)-Feeding).

Each pen contained one plastic dog house and housed two to four small-breed dogs. The dog houses were about two feet wide, two feet high, and three feet long. In the pens housing Shih Tzus and dogs that were each about a foot long, not all the animals could fit in the dog house at once and lie in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

Dog houses in three Shih Tzu pens were covered in a dirty build-up. Because these pens had a thick layer of rocks on the ground, it is likely the build-up was excrement (3.1(c)(1)(3)-Surfaces).

Many dogs in these pens had matted fur. One pen contained a mixed-breed dog and a Maltese that had small mats covering its coat. Many Shih Tzu, too, were matted, some slightly matted and others with thick tufts of dirty fur on their undersides and around their faces (2.40-Vet care).

Outdoor cages

Two sets of outdoor cages were located next to the outdoor pens described above. Each set had three cages raised above the ground on cinderblocks and wood. These cages had wire walls and treated-wire floorings and had a fully-enclosed wooden box accessed by a dog door at the end of the pen. Water dishes and pieces of carpet were on the treated-wire flooring of these cages. Only two cages were occupied, one with two Dachshunds and another with three Chihuahuas.

The flooring of the Chihuahua pen had feces mashed into the wire in several places (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Published in Oklahoma
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 18:54

Miller, John Henry

Breeds: Clumber Spaniels, Yorkshire Terriers, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

On the premises at the time of investigation: approximately 140 dogs.

This facility consisted of several rows of outdoor pens linked to kennel buildings, along with a building with indoor/outdoor cages for small breeds dogs.

Outdoor pens

There were about 40 outdoor pens, some with outdoor dog houses and others connected to indoor pens via doggie doors. These pens housed a variety of large and small breeds, including Clumber Spaniels and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.

Most of these pens contained more than 24 hours’ accumulation of feces; one pen housing three Cavaliers and two Clumber Spaniels had a pile of feces in its center that appeared to be more than a week’s accumulation of feces (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Kennel building

The small-breed kennel building had two rows of ten cages along each of two walls, one row set above the other along each wall. These cages were made of treated wire and had plastic sheets below them to catch feces and debris.

There were two dogs of various breeds per cage, many of which had thick mats in their fur (2.40-Vet care). Two dogs that appeared to be mixed-breed had small mats mostly on their undersides, and two Yorkshire Terriers had thick mats covering their rear ends and undersides. One of the Yorkies had large clumps of feces in the fur around its anus (2.40-Vet care).

Dog carrier

A plastic dog carrier, about 2.5 feet long, 1.5 feet high, and one foot wide, was on the ground near the kennel building. There were two Shih Tzus in the carrier, each about a foot long and with small mats throughout their coats (2.40-Vet care); (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures); (3.6(c)(1)(iii)-Primary enclosures;).

Feces were smeared on the carrier floor, and a single, empty plastic dish was at the back of the dog carrier (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures); (3.9(a) and (b)-Feeding; (3.10-Watering); (OK ST T.21 – 1685 Cruelty to animals).

Published in Oklahoma
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 17:16

Craig, Dwayne - D & G Kennels

Approximately 70 dogs and 20 puppies. Breeds: Cocker Spaniels, Boxers, Labrador Retrievers, Toy Poodles, Standard Poodles

Dwayne Craig’s facility consisted primarily of outdoor pens. One whelping building contained indoor and outdoor enclosures.

Outdoor pens
Two adjacent outdoor pens sat at the rear end of the property behind Dwayne Craig’s house, near a wooded area. These pens had dirt floorings with five-foot-tall thick-gauge metal wire walls and untreated wooden poles at the corners (3.4(c)-Construction). These poles supported a wooden-framed roof over the two pens.

Each pen was about 15 feet wide and 15 feet long. One housed a single adult Boxer, and the second had two adult boxers. Both pens had a plastic igloo-type dog house about two feet tall, three feet wide, and three feet long. Plastic food and water dishes sat on the flooring. The food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). The floorings of the pens were littered with feces present more than a day (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

The pen containing a single Boxer had a lawnmower placed within inches of its wire wall and a propane tank was within five feet of the same wall (3.11(c)-Housekeeping for premises). The adjacent pen had a large pile of wood boards stacked about two feet high directly against one of its walls (3.11(c)-Housekeeping for premises).

Next to these pens was a row of sheltered pens. The two pens closest to the Boxer pens described above each measured about 25 feet long and 12 feet wide, with the back 10 feet (closest to the woods) covered by an angled metal roof with wooden supports. Each of these pens had a single adult Boxer. Floorings were dirt, partially covered with small grey wooden rocks. Each pen contained plastic and metal food and water dishes. The water dishes contained brown water in which dirt had settled to the bottom of (3.10-Watering). Food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding).

An adjacent pen about 15 feet wide and 10 feet long with thick-gauged wire walls did not have any dogs in it at the time. The flooring of this pen was covered with piles of feces (3.11(a)-Cleaning). It contained a black plastic barrel, about two feet tall and four feet long lying on its side for a dog house with a doggie door cut out of it, and water dishes filled with brown water in which dirt had settled to the bottom of (3.10-Watering). Untreated wood boards were nailed together to create a wooden slat about a foot wide, 2.5 feet long, and four inches tall, in front of the dog house. This wood was chewed and splintered (3.1(c)(2)-Housing facilities, general). Smaller-gauge rusty wire was set at the bottom of one wall with its sharp ends sticking to the pen (3.1(c)(1)(i and ii)-Housing facilities, general).

Two pens were located behind this one each four adult Cocker Spaniels. The back half of each pen was enclosed on all sides, covered with angled roofs, and had a wooden ramp leading to doggie doors in the pen-side wall. Floorings were covered with piles of feces that had not been cleaned in more than a day (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

A series of eight pens continued along the line of the woods. Each pen measured 15 feet wide and 15 feet long with five-foot-tall chain link walls. Some of the dirt floorings were partially covered with small grey rocks and others were nearly completely covered with the rocks. Each pen was covered with an angled metal roof with wooden framing. There were metal and plastic water and food dishes on the ground. The water dishes contained brown water, most of which had dirt settled at the bottom (3.10-Watering). Food containers were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). Cinder blocks and large rocks had been placed inside the walls facing the Craig house, presumably to prevent dogs from digging out of their pens in that direction (3.1(a)-Structure; construction).

One pen housed three adult Cocker Spaniels and contained a single wooden dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long. The dog house was not large enough to allow all of the dogs to lie down in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

An adjacent pen contained an adult Labrador Retriever weighing about 65 pounds and an adult Cocker Spaniel weighing about 30 pound (3.7-Compatible grouping). The pen contained a single plastic dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long . It was not large enough for both dogs to lie down in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

Another pen of this group housed an adult Standard Poodle weighing about 45 pounds, an adult Cocker Spaniel weighing about 30 pounds, an adult Toy Poodle weighing about 20 pounds, and a Boxer puppy weighing about 20 pounds (3.7-Incompatible grouping). This pen had a single wooden dog house about 2.5 feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long. It also was not large enough for all of the dogs to lie down in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements). The remaining pens of this group each held about three adult Cocker Spaniels and contained a dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long. They were not large enough for all of the dogs to lie down in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

Another series of pens was placed about 20 feet closer to the Craig house. The pens had dirt floorings partially covered with small grey rocks. A wooden-framed roof covered these pens. Two more pens each had a 25 lb. Boxer and Labrador puppy, two plastic dog houses (about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long) and several plastic and metal food and water dishes set on the dirt flooring. The water dishes were filled with brown water (3.10-Watering), and the food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b) Feeding).

The second chain-link pen contained a plastic dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long. It also contained a blue plastic swimming pool a foot tall filled with brown water. Also in this pen was a wooden platform, about a foot wide, two inches long, and four inches tall. It was made of untreated wooden boards nailed together (3.4(c)-Construction). The wooden boards were chewed and splintered (3.1(c)(2)-Maintenance and replacement of surfaces). A metal water dish in the pen was filled with green water (3.10-Watering).

There were about three other pens in this series. These pens had five-foot-tall thick-gauge metal wire walls and wooden beams at the corners supporting a roof. They measured about 15 feet long and 15 feet wide and had dirt floorings partially covered with small grey rocks. These pens housed adult Labrador Retrievers. The pen closest to the chain link pens held three Labradors and contained a single wooden dog house about four feet tall, four feet wide, and five feet long (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

A set of about eight pens was located closer to the Craig house. Each pen held about three to four adult Cocker Spaniels. Dirt floorings were partially covered with small grey rocks. Each pen had five-foot-tall chain link fencing and a wooden-framed roof. In the second and fourth pens in this group, the chain link fencing facing away from the house had separated from the ground (3.1(c)(ii)-Surfaces). These fences had cinder blocks placed at their loose bottoms to keep them in place (3.1(a)-Structure; construction). The chain link fencing facing away from the house on the third pen was completely pulled away from supports on all sides except the bottom and was out several inches from the pen (3.1(a)-Structure; construction) (3.1(c)(ii)-Surfaces). The pens had plastic and metal food and water containers on the pen flooring. The water containers were filled with brown water in which dirt had settled to the bottom of (3.10-Watering). The food containers were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding).

Whelping building
A single story whelping building about thirty feet wide and twenty feet wide with a peaked metal roof was located between the row of pens near Craig’s house and the row of pens near the woods. The building had metal siding, and its roof extended over the building wall about 15 feet on the side opposite the driveway. Under this overhang were several outdoor cages made of treated wire. They were each about two feet tall, three feet long, and three feet wide. The cages were raised about five feet above the ground and accessible from the inside of the whelping building through doggie doors. Under these cages were piles of feces about three feet in diameter and more than two inches thick (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). One of these cages held a nursing Cocker Spaniel mother and a puppy less than two weeks of age. The flooring of this pen sagged more than two inches in the middle from one end of the cage to the other (3.1(a)-Structure; construction).

Published in Oklahoma
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 16:53

Craig, Dwayne - D & G Kennels

Breeds: Cocker Spaniels, Boxers, Yorkshire Terriers, Dachshunds, Miniature Poodles

On the premises at the time of investigation: approximately 50 dogs and five puppies.

I initially visited Dwayne Craig’s facility on 2/27/07. Because I observed the dogs in the kennel had no food on the 27th and many appeared emaciated, I returned on the 28th and found the same conditions.

The facility itself had an outdoor housing area with Cocker Spaniel and Boxer pens, a building with indoor/outdoor pens for Boxers, and a kennel building for small-breed dogs.

Outdoor pens

The outdoor housing had about 20 pens on concrete floorings with wire walls. The pens were arranged in two rows with a concrete walkway between them and a metal roof covering both rows. Each had a single plastic dog house, most of which measured 3.5 feet in width, height, and length. Because these pens housed two to four Cocker Spaniels – or one to two Boxers – each, the dog houses could not accommodate all of the dogs at once and allow them to turn about freely or lie in a normal manner (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

There were food and water dishes on the floor; some of these pens had plastic water buckets attached to the walls. The food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta or pests (3.9(b)-Feeding).

The water dishes all had only about an inch of water in them and showed a murky, brown substance accumulated at the bottom (3.10-Watering).

All of the food dishes were empty, and one Cocker Spaniel and several Boxers were clearly emaciated (3.9(a)-Feeding). Their stomachs were sucked in, and the Boxers’ ribs and spines were visible (2.40-Vet care); (OK ST T.21 – 1685 Cruelty to animals).

There was more than a week’s accumulation of feces in each pen (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

One pen housed two miniature Poodles; one had very thick, hanging mats all over its body (2.40-Vet care).

Boxer building

The Boxer building was a small barn with indoor/outdoor pens connected by doggie doors. Three pens housed a single Boxer, yet all of the pens had more than a week’s accumulation of feces. Two pens had feces covering the entire surface area of the outdoor flooring (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Empty food dishes were on the outside pen floorings (3.9(a); (3.9(b)-Feeding), as were water dishes containing about an inch of murky brown water (3.10-Watering). Whelping building

The other kennel building housed whelping dogs of various breeds with their puppies and several small-breed breeders. There were several elevated indoor/outdoor enclosures connected by doggie doors. The outdoor pens were wire cages; the indoor pens were plastic boxes with wire doors and floorings. One housed a Yorkie breeder, and several others housed whelping Cocker Spaniel mothers and puppies.

The lights were off in the building, and the small amount of light from the windows did not allow viewing inside the indoor pens (3.2(c)-Lighting).

The indoor wire structures, about five total, were elevated about a foot above the floor and were arranged in two adjacent rows. Each cage was about two feet wide and high and six feet long. One housed an adult Dachshund; this pen had about a week’s accumulation of feces on the cage’s wire flooring (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Another pen housed a Boxer puppy, about eight weeks old, whose head nearly touched the top of the cage when it stood in a normal manner (3.6(c)(1)(iii)-Primary enclosures). Another pen housed two Boxer puppies less than eight weeks old.

Water dishes containing less than a half-inch of water, and empty self-feeders, were in each cage (3.10-Watering, 3.9(a)-Feeding).

An empty cage had feces covering almost the entire wire flooring of the enclosure (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

The adult Dachshund and Boxer puppies exhibited stomachs that were sucked-in and protruding ribs, indicating they were emaciated (2.40-Vet care); (OK ST T.21 – 1685 Cruelty to animals).

Published in Oklahoma
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 15:40

Brooke, Glenn - Brookglen Kennel

Approximately 40 dogs. Breeds: Goldendoodles, Labradoodles, Standard Poodles, Golden Retrievers

Glen Brooke’s kennel had two sections: One area had Standard Poodles, Labradors, and Golden Retrievers used for breeding, and the other area had Goldendoodles and Labradoodles not used for breeding.

The facility containing Goldendoodles and Labradoodles consisted of two sections, each with four pens. Each six foot by six foot pen had four, 50-pound dogs. The pens had dirt flooring and chain link walls. Worn blue tarps covered some of the walls. The tarps had large holes, and some had two to three feet of the lower section completely ripped off (3.1(c)(2)-Maintenance and replacement of surfaces) (3.4(b)(2)-Shelter from the elements).

The dirt floorings were littered with feces several days old, thick enough that the dogs could not avoid stepping in it (3.1(c)(3)-Cleaning). The dog house in each pen was not large enough for the four dogs to be inside at one time and lie in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4-Shelter from the elements). None of the dog houses had wind/rain breaks on their entrances (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements). All of the pens had chain link roofing covered with tarps.

Each pen had a plastic water bucket large enough to contain about five gallons of water. They held about one gallon at the time. The water was dirty enough to obscure the bottom of the bucket (3.10-Watering). Each pen also contained a PVC self-feeder positioned on concrete slab. The feeders were on the dirt ground in a manner that did not minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). The bottom parts of all feeders were covered with dirt and feces (3.11(b)-Sanitization of food and water receptacles).

The other kennel consisted of about twelve pens. Each pen had indoor and outdoor sections. The outdoor sections were about 30 feet long and six feet wide. They had concrete floorings and six-foot-high chain link walls. Each of these pens had a plastic water bucket, self feeder and a plastic swimming pool about five feet in diameter and a foot tall. All of the swimming pools were filled with water.

The entire kennel had six-foot-high weeds surrounding it, most within one to two feet of the chain link walls. Some touched the chain link walls themselves (3.11(c)-Housekeeping for premises).

Glenn Brooke said that about six months ago he stopped paying his USDA fees and that the USDA then revoked his license. Brooke said he believed he should have a USDA license for the number of dogs he has. He also said he wondered if he would get in trouble for not having a license, but commented he would “handle that problem when it comes.” Brooke said that he previously sold to a broker but claimed that he currently did not. He added that breeders must have a USDA license to sell to brokers.

Published in Oklahoma

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Cohasset, MA 02025
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501 (c)(3) Tax ID#: 58-2040413

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Class Action Lawsuits

scales of justice

If you purchased a sick or dying puppy from Barkworks or Happiness is Pets, you may be able to join consumer class action lawsuits. The first step is to fill out the CAPS complaint form.

Read more about Happiness is Pets or Barkworks.

CAPS Complaint Form