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Investigations

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Models & CAPS

What do you get when you combine glamorous fashion models with cute dogs rescued from un-glamorous puppy mills?

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Kleven, Linda and Craig - Fair View Kennels

Media

Linda and Craig Kleven
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  • Owners: Kleven, Linda and Craig
  • Business name: Fair View Kennels
  • Address: 25221 330th Ave.
  • City, State Zip: Walnut Grove, MN 56180
  • Year: 2005
  • Date of CAPS Investigation: 2005-06-14


Approximately 130 dogs and no puppies. Breeds: Italian Greyhounds, Pekingese, West Highland Terriers, Fox Terriers, Chihuahuas, Shih Tzus, Lhasa Apsos, Miniature Schnauzers

The Kleven kennel had three different buildings. The largest was a metal barn with four interior walls each containing 10 cages accommodating both sides of the wall. Doggie-doors in the walls connected the two parts of each cage. The cages were raised about 2.5 feet above the floor and were made with plastic beams for their corners and treated wire for their walls, ceilings, and floors. The cage sections on either side of the wall was about 2.5 feet wide, 2.5 feet long, and 2.5 feet high, making each enclosure 2.5 feet wide and five feet long. Several enclosures housed four to five dogs up to 1.5 feet long from the bases of their noses to the tips of their tails in overcrowded conditions (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Space).

Plastic self feeders and water dishes were set in each cage. Concrete floors under the cages, were covered in fecal stains and small piles of standing water (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces) (3.1(f)-Drainage and waste disposal).

Second building
Another kennel building had two rows of about ten cages each. These indoor cages were raised about 2.5 feet above the concrete floor and were made with plastic beams at their corners, treated wire for ceilings and floors, and wooden boards for walls. The kennel was poorly lit from a few windows that let in sunlight (3.2(c)-Lighting).

Though only one cage was occupied with dogs, all of the cages had more than 24 hours’ accumulation of feces under them (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). The walls were covered in fecal stains (3.1(c)(3)-Surfaces).

The occupied cage contained a Shih Tzu and a West Highland Terrier. The Westie was missing fur on about half its body, and its right ear appeared to be oozing a clear discharge (2.40-Vet care).

A metal water dish was on the flooring of this cage, and a plastic self-feeder was attached to the cage wall. Dirty build-up covered the self feeder (3.9(b)-Feeding). .

Third building
The third kennel building was a metal barn with about a dozen enclosures built along two of its walls. Each enclosure consisted of an outdoor pen and indoor cage connected by doggie-doors, many of which were hanging off of their frames (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements). The outdoor pens had concrete floors and chain link walls. There were three dogs per enclosure. A Cavalier King Charles Spaniel in one pen was missing about a quarter of the fur on its body (2.40-Vet care).

Each pen had several days’ accumulation of feces underneath it (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). Gutters lining the outdoor pens at the ends furthest from the building were completely filled with feces, urine, and water (3.1(f)-Drainage and waste disposal).

The indoor pens had concrete floorings, plastic walls and chain link doors. The walls and floors were covered in feces stains (3.1(c)(3)-Surfaces). The floors were layered with wood chips that were soaked with urine and excrement. The wet concrete had several days of fecal accumulation (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Plastic self feeders with dirty build-up on their surfaces were attached to the pen walls (3.9(b)-Feeding), and metal water buckets full of brown dingy water were on the pen floors (3.10-Watering).

Each pen contained a plastic dog house, some merely plastic barrels, unsecured to the pen floors (3.1(a)-Structure; construction) with doors cut in them. Cobwebs covered the surfaces of the kennel building (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces), and the lighting was very poor, with no artificial lighting in the building itself (3.2(c)-Lighting).

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Deborah Howard

Deborah Howard

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Companion Animal Protection Society (CAPS)
759 CJC Hwy., #332
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Class Action Lawsuits

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If you purchased a sick or dying puppy from Barkworks or Happiness is Pets, you may be able to join consumer class action lawsuits. The first step is to fill out the CAPS complaint form.

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