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Craig, Dwayne - D & G Kennels

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{remote}http://www.caps-web.org/={/remote} Dwayne Craig
  • Owners: Craig, Dwayne
  • Business name: D & G Kennels
  • Address: RR 1 Box 151
  • City, State Zip: Spiro, OK 74959
  • Year: 2004
  • USDA License: 73-A-1369
  • USDA Inspector: Roy Ramsey, ACI
  • USDA Inspections: 2003-02-20
  • Date of CAPS Investigation: 2004-08-21


Approximately 70 dogs and 20 puppies. Breeds: Cocker Spaniels, Boxers, Labrador Retrievers, Toy Poodles, Standard Poodles

Dwayne Craig’s facility consisted primarily of outdoor pens. One whelping building contained indoor and outdoor enclosures.

Outdoor pens
Two adjacent outdoor pens sat at the rear end of the property behind Dwayne Craig’s house, near a wooded area. These pens had dirt floorings with five-foot-tall thick-gauge metal wire walls and untreated wooden poles at the corners (3.4(c)-Construction). These poles supported a wooden-framed roof over the two pens.

Each pen was about 15 feet wide and 15 feet long. One housed a single adult Boxer, and the second had two adult boxers. Both pens had a plastic igloo-type dog house about two feet tall, three feet wide, and three feet long. Plastic food and water dishes sat on the flooring. The food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). The floorings of the pens were littered with feces present more than a day (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

The pen containing a single Boxer had a lawnmower placed within inches of its wire wall and a propane tank was within five feet of the same wall (3.11(c)-Housekeeping for premises). The adjacent pen had a large pile of wood boards stacked about two feet high directly against one of its walls (3.11(c)-Housekeeping for premises).

Next to these pens was a row of sheltered pens. The two pens closest to the Boxer pens described above each measured about 25 feet long and 12 feet wide, with the back 10 feet (closest to the woods) covered by an angled metal roof with wooden supports. Each of these pens had a single adult Boxer. Floorings were dirt, partially covered with small grey wooden rocks. Each pen contained plastic and metal food and water dishes. The water dishes contained brown water in which dirt had settled to the bottom of (3.10-Watering). Food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding).

An adjacent pen about 15 feet wide and 10 feet long with thick-gauged wire walls did not have any dogs in it at the time. The flooring of this pen was covered with piles of feces (3.11(a)-Cleaning). It contained a black plastic barrel, about two feet tall and four feet long lying on its side for a dog house with a doggie door cut out of it, and water dishes filled with brown water in which dirt had settled to the bottom of (3.10-Watering). Untreated wood boards were nailed together to create a wooden slat about a foot wide, 2.5 feet long, and four inches tall, in front of the dog house. This wood was chewed and splintered (3.1(c)(2)-Housing facilities, general). Smaller-gauge rusty wire was set at the bottom of one wall with its sharp ends sticking to the pen (3.1(c)(1)(i and ii)-Housing facilities, general).

Two pens were located behind this one each four adult Cocker Spaniels. The back half of each pen was enclosed on all sides, covered with angled roofs, and had a wooden ramp leading to doggie doors in the pen-side wall. Floorings were covered with piles of feces that had not been cleaned in more than a day (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

A series of eight pens continued along the line of the woods. Each pen measured 15 feet wide and 15 feet long with five-foot-tall chain link walls. Some of the dirt floorings were partially covered with small grey rocks and others were nearly completely covered with the rocks. Each pen was covered with an angled metal roof with wooden framing. There were metal and plastic water and food dishes on the ground. The water dishes contained brown water, most of which had dirt settled at the bottom (3.10-Watering). Food containers were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). Cinder blocks and large rocks had been placed inside the walls facing the Craig house, presumably to prevent dogs from digging out of their pens in that direction (3.1(a)-Structure; construction).

One pen housed three adult Cocker Spaniels and contained a single wooden dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long. The dog house was not large enough to allow all of the dogs to lie down in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

An adjacent pen contained an adult Labrador Retriever weighing about 65 pounds and an adult Cocker Spaniel weighing about 30 pound (3.7-Compatible grouping). The pen contained a single plastic dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long . It was not large enough for both dogs to lie down in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

Another pen of this group housed an adult Standard Poodle weighing about 45 pounds, an adult Cocker Spaniel weighing about 30 pounds, an adult Toy Poodle weighing about 20 pounds, and a Boxer puppy weighing about 20 pounds (3.7-Incompatible grouping). This pen had a single wooden dog house about 2.5 feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long. It also was not large enough for all of the dogs to lie down in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements). The remaining pens of this group each held about three adult Cocker Spaniels and contained a dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long. They were not large enough for all of the dogs to lie down in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

Another series of pens was placed about 20 feet closer to the Craig house. The pens had dirt floorings partially covered with small grey rocks. A wooden-framed roof covered these pens. Two more pens each had a 25 lb. Boxer and Labrador puppy, two plastic dog houses (about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long) and several plastic and metal food and water dishes set on the dirt flooring. The water dishes were filled with brown water (3.10-Watering), and the food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b) Feeding).

The second chain-link pen contained a plastic dog house about two feet tall, two feet wide, and three feet long. It also contained a blue plastic swimming pool a foot tall filled with brown water. Also in this pen was a wooden platform, about a foot wide, two inches long, and four inches tall. It was made of untreated wooden boards nailed together (3.4(c)-Construction). The wooden boards were chewed and splintered (3.1(c)(2)-Maintenance and replacement of surfaces). A metal water dish in the pen was filled with green water (3.10-Watering).

There were about three other pens in this series. These pens had five-foot-tall thick-gauge metal wire walls and wooden beams at the corners supporting a roof. They measured about 15 feet long and 15 feet wide and had dirt floorings partially covered with small grey rocks. These pens housed adult Labrador Retrievers. The pen closest to the chain link pens held three Labradors and contained a single wooden dog house about four feet tall, four feet wide, and five feet long (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

A set of about eight pens was located closer to the Craig house. Each pen held about three to four adult Cocker Spaniels. Dirt floorings were partially covered with small grey rocks. Each pen had five-foot-tall chain link fencing and a wooden-framed roof. In the second and fourth pens in this group, the chain link fencing facing away from the house had separated from the ground (3.1(c)(ii)-Surfaces). These fences had cinder blocks placed at their loose bottoms to keep them in place (3.1(a)-Structure; construction). The chain link fencing facing away from the house on the third pen was completely pulled away from supports on all sides except the bottom and was out several inches from the pen (3.1(a)-Structure; construction) (3.1(c)(ii)-Surfaces). The pens had plastic and metal food and water containers on the pen flooring. The water containers were filled with brown water in which dirt had settled to the bottom of (3.10-Watering). The food containers were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding).

Whelping building
A single story whelping building about thirty feet wide and twenty feet wide with a peaked metal roof was located between the row of pens near Craig’s house and the row of pens near the woods. The building had metal siding, and its roof extended over the building wall about 15 feet on the side opposite the driveway. Under this overhang were several outdoor cages made of treated wire. They were each about two feet tall, three feet long, and three feet wide. The cages were raised about five feet above the ground and accessible from the inside of the whelping building through doggie doors. Under these cages were piles of feces about three feet in diameter and more than two inches thick (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). One of these cages held a nursing Cocker Spaniel mother and a puppy less than two weeks of age. The flooring of this pen sagged more than two inches in the middle from one end of the cage to the other (3.1(a)-Structure; construction).

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