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Wednesday, 25 July 2012 19:32

Raber, Ervin - Golden View Kennels

Approximately 70 dogs and four puppies. Breeds: Jack Russell Terriers, Bichon Frises, Miniature Schnauzers, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, West Highland Terriers, Chihuahuas, Dachshunds, Lhasa Apsos, Papillons, Pekingese, Cocker Spaniels

Golden View Kennels had one primary kennel and a smaller, secondary kennel. The smaller kennel was an indoor structure with two pens, each containing two adult Jack Russell Terriers. The pens were on concrete flooring with a layer of straw thrown over them, had untreated thin-gauge wire for walls (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures), water dishes placed on the ground and metal self-feeders on their walls.

The main kennel was a trailer converted into a kennel. The western side of the kennel had two rows of indoor/outdoor cages on it that were connected by doggie-doors - one row placed above another. Each row contained 10 cages, and each cage contained two to four dogs of various breeds. The indoor cages had water lines run into each one, and metal self-feeders were attached to the walls. The cages themselves were made of treated plastic wire. All of the cages were about two feet tall, wide, and long.

With many of the dogs being 12 to 14 inches in length from the tips of their noses to the bases of their tails, cages containing three to four dogs were overcrowded (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Space). One cage contained an adult Pekingese and an approximately four-week-old puppy whose paws fell through the holes of the wire floor (3.6(a)(2)(x)-Primary enclosures).

Plastic sheets were underneath the cages to catch debris, and the sheets were covered in fecal stains (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces). The outside cages were over 10 feet above the ground. They had several months of fecal accumulation below them on the dirt ground (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). Flies were swarming around the feces that was piled up to two feet tall (3.11(d)-Pest Control). Clumps of feces-stained fur were hanging from the floorings of the outdoor pens (3.1(c)(3)-Surfaces).

A large plastic sheet was attached to the edge of the outdoor cages’ lower row. It touched the ground. The sheet was attached to the edge furthest from the kennel building. This allowed the sheet to trap debris from the cages, which in turn accumulated on the ground (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). The sheet itself was covered in fecal stains and clumps of feces and fur (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces).

There were several other cages in the structure. The southeast corner of the building had two cages in it, one stacked on top of the other. Each cage was about 1.5 feet wide and tall and three feet long, and made of treated wire. Water pipes were run into the cages, and metal self-feeders were attached to the wire walls.

The top cage contained a Cocker Spaniel and Dachshund puppy. The bottom cage had a Lhasa Apso about Dachshund, which were 12 inches long from the tips of their noses to the bases of their tails (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Space). The cages had several days of feces accumulation on plastic sheets under the wire floorings (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). Kibble littered the kennel floor around the cages (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces).

There were two whelping pens located just north of the doorway on the east side of the building. The pens were about five feet above the ground and had plastic whelping boxes and treated wire cages. There were outdoor cages accessible by doggie-doors from the whelping cages.

The north end of the building contained an office area with two wire cages, one above the other. They had plastic sheets below their floors to catch debris. Water pipes and metal self-feeders were in each cage. The top enclosure held three West Highland Terrier puppies; the bottom cage contained two adult Bichon Frises. The cages were each about 1.5 feet wide and three feet long, and the Bichons were each about 12 inches long from the tips of their noses to the bases of their tails (3.1(c)(1) Surfaces).

Near the house was an adult Boxer that was tethered by a chain (3.6(c)(4)-Prohibited means of primary enclosure). The dog had a dog house and food and water dishes.

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 19:15

Mullet, James & Ruth - J & R Kennel

If you view the Ohio video, please fast-forward to find the Mullets.

Note: No written report is available.

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 19:12

Mullet, James & Ruth - J & R Kennel

Approximately 80 dogs. Breeds: Sheepdogs, Boxers, Bull Mastiffs, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Dachshunds, West Highland Terriers, Bichon Frises, Yorkshire Terriers,

J & R Kennel had a central indoor kennel, a row of indoor/outdoor cages for small breed dogs, and a row of outdoor pens for the larger breeds. I was able to observe about eight of these pens, each made from chain link walls and treated wire floors. Plastic sheets were placed several inches below the floors, covered in over two weeks of fecal accumulation (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Each pen contained two adult dogs of various breeds, including Sheepdogs, Boxers, and Bull Mastiffs. Each pen also had a wooden dog house in it. The dog houses were each about 2.5 feet wide and four feet long. They were made of wood covered in peeling paint and chewed, worn edges (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces). They had open doggie-doors about two feet from the backs of the pens. The doors, however, lacked windbreaks (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements). The dog houses were not large enough for both dogs in each pen to be in at once and lie in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements).

The row of outdoor cages for small breed dogs had doggie-doors to access indoor cages. The outdoor cages were made entirely of treated wire and were about four feet above the ground. Each cage had two dogs in it of various breeds, including Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Dachshunds, West Highland Terriers, Bichon Frises, and Yorkshire Terriers. There was over two weeks of fecal accumulation piled up underneath the cages (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

The indoor kennel room was visible only through a dingy window that was so encrusted with grime one could only see that inside the room were about 30 to 40 dogs (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces). A row of cages in the middle of the room held dogs of about 40 pounds in weight. These cages had no tops, and the dogs inside could lift them selves up and get their front legs entirely over the walls which did not secure the animals properly (3.1(a)-Structure; construction). Under elevated cages that contained one to two dogs each were piles of fecal accumulation that appeared to be several days of build-up (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 18:51

Miller, Atlee

Approximately 35 dogs and three puppies. Breeds: Yorkshire Terriers, Eskimos, Bichon Frises The Miller’s kennel consisted of a wooden barn with 10 indoor/outdoor enclosures on two opposite sides. It had PVC piping and treated wire with doggie-doors in between the indoor and outdoor cages. The floors of the outdoor cages were treated wire with plastic sheets underneath to catch debris; the indoor cages had plastic floorings. The wire floors of the outdoor cages were both sagging and bent low (3.1(a)- Structure; construction). In one area the wire was broken so there were sharp edges pointing into the pens (3.1(c)(1)(ii)-Surfaces). There were several days of fecal accumulation on the plastic sheeting under the wire floors (3.11(a)- Cleaning of primary enclosures). The ground next to the sheeting had months of fecal accumulation piled next to it and washed along the ground (3.1(f)-Drainage and waste disposal). The indoor cages had fecal stains on their plastic walls and floors (3.1(c)(3)-Surfaces). Metal self feeders and plastic water dishes were in each cage. Each enclosure contained two to four dogs. Cleaning, medical, and storage supplies, as well as plastic bins full of food, were stored on top of the indoor cages (3.1(e)-Storage). There were five whelping enclosures in the barn, two set above another three, and lifted about four feet above the ground. Each enclosure had a plastic holding cage with a doggie-door to access a treated wire cage. The plastic cages had fecal stains covering their walls, and three had feces smeared all over their floorings (3.1(c)(3)-Surfaces). About a week’s worth of feces and kibble covered plastic sheets under the floors of the wire cages (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). Two cages had adult Bichon Frises, one with a single Bichon puppy and the other with two Bichon puppies. The cages containing puppies had mats on their plastic floors. The doggie-doors of the enclosures were holes cut in the plastic walls, which were left open for the puppies inside to climb through; their paws could slip through the holes of the wire floorings outside (3.1(a)-Structure; construction). The floor of the kennel was covered in dirt and kibble, smeared along its surface (3.1(c)(3)-Cleaning). The windows lining the walls of the kennel were dingy and covered in a white and brown residue (3.1(c)(1)-Surfaces).
Published in Ohio
Approximately eight dogs. Breeds: Bichon Frises, West Highland Terriers, Beagles

The main kennel building at the Masts’ property was about eight feet long and four feet wid. It had plastic siding and a shingled roof. Along each eight-foot wall were two rows of four cages with one row set on top of the other. Each cage had an indoor and outdoor pen connected by a metal doggie-door. There were four adult Bichons and two adult West Highland Terriers housed here with one dog per cage. Each dog had a metal chain around its neck with a metal tag on it. One of the adult Bichons had hair loss in an area about six inches in diameter around its back (2.40-Vet Care).

The outdoor cages were made entirely of treated thin-gauge wire. Plastic sheets curved from the wall to a foot under the cages to catch feces and debris, and it was obvious more than 24 hours’ accumulation of feces was beneath each occupied cage (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). Underneath each bottom sheet was more than a month’s accumulation of feces (3.11(a) Cleaning of primary enclosures). Four-inch-wide PVC pipes ran from the ends of each sheet facing away from the owners’ house to the ground. The pipes from both sides of the building connected and extended about five feet to a snow-covered pile of feces about four inches deep (3.1(f)-Drainage and waste disposal). Feces and clumps of fur were caked into the crevices between the pipes and the building just below the plastic sheets (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

An end cage on a bottom row had mangled wire, bent up and down in waves and protruding in sharp points in two places at the top of the cage (3.1(a)-Structure, construction). The roof of another bottom cage was mangled in a similar manner with the wire pushed away from the kennel wall (3.1(a)-Structure, construction); (3.6(a)(2)(i)-Primary enclosures).

The inside cages were made with treated thin-gauge wire with plastic boards between the cages. Plastic sheets were placed beneath the cages and angled downward to catch feces and debris. The sheets were stained with feces and fur (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces).

Each cage had a plastic tub about 1.5 wide, 1.5 feet long, and four inches high. While many of these tubs had feces-smeared bottoms (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures), several had blankets in them. Plastic plates about eight inches wide and long were on them (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). Each cage an empty plastic self feeder attached to it, and a lix-it watering system fed a water spigot in each cage. The tops of several cages had wire bent down a few inches into the cages (3.1(a)-Structure, construction).

There was a Beagle enclosure about 20 feet from the kennel. This outdoor pen was five feet wide, 12 feet long and surrounded by five-foot-high chain-link fencing. Inside were two adult Beagles and a plastic barrel about 1.5 feet wide and three feet long. The plastic barrel had no bedding inside (3.4(b)(4)-Shelter from the elements) and was not large enough for both Beagles to occupy at once and lie in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements). It had a wooden board set in front of it to hold it in place and no windbreak on its entrance (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements). There was an empty plastic food dish and a plastic water dish filled with ice (3.10-Watering).

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 18:37

Martin, Delton - Shady Maple Kennel

Approximately 80 dogs and 20 puppies. Breeds: English Bulldogs, Poodles, Dachshunds, Pomeranians, Boston Terriers, Pugs, Cocker Spaniels, Bichon Frises, Yorkshire Terriers, Cairn Terriers, Shih Tzus, Schnauzers, Chihuahuas, Mixed breeds

This indoor facility had a room of breeder cages and a smaller room with puppy and whelping cages and storage for cleaning and medical supplies.

The vertically stacked puppy cages in the smaller room were about a foot wide, two feet long, and a foot high. The bottom cage was empty, the middle cage contained two Yorkshire Terrier puppies, and the top cage contained two Shih Tzu puppies. Each puppy was about six-weeks-old.

These puppy cages were made entirely of untreated, thin-gauge wire (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures) and each had a plastic self feeder and water spigot. Each had a plastic tray below it to catch debris and excreta, and all trays, including the one under the empty cage, had several days’ accumulation of feces, (3.11(a) Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Also in this room were four whelping enclosures in a row along one wall and two adjacent whelping enclosures along the opposite wall. They were all three feet above the floor. Each enclosure consisted of a treated-wire cage and a plastic whelping box. The cage and box of each enclosure were each 1.5 cubic feet. Each enclosure housed a nursing bitch and several puppies. One cage had a Cocker Spaniel mother about 20 inches long with several nursing puppies (3.6(c)(1)(i)(ii)-Primary enclosures), and another cage housed a Maltese mother about 16 inches long with several nursing puppies (3.6(c)(1)(i)(ii)-Primary enclosures)

The boxes were accessible by a doggie-door from its cage, and a door from the outside wall. Each cage had a plastic self feeder and water spigot. The Maltese mother’s fur was covered in thick mats (2.40-Vet Care).

The main kennel area, which had several windows, electric lighting, and concrete flooring, had three rows of cages. Each row consisted of ten cages, each about 2.5 feet wide, five feet long, and three feet high. The cages were raised about three feet above the ground on wooden frames, were made of treated wire, and had plastic self feeders and water spigots attached to the walls. There were two to three dogs per cage, with some of the dogs up to 20 inches in length (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures). Dogs of various breeds were mixed together in cages.

Cages had more than a week’s accumulation of feces under them. Wood shavings were mixed with the feces, and it appeared that shavings were thrown over old feces repeatedly so that piles more than a foot high were formed under the cages (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). Many cages had fur and excreta hanging from the wire floorings and the bottoms of the feeders (3.1(c)(3)-Surfaces).

Several Schnauzers and Maltese had large mats in their fur (2.40-Vet Care).

There were two additional pens in this room, each about four feet long and four feet wide. These pens had four-foot-high walls made of plastic sheets. Each pen had a plastic self feeder and a water spigot and housed a single English Bulldog. Floors were rubber mats raised several inches above the ground. There was about a week’s accumulation of feces on each mat (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Dozens of dog food bags were stored on wooden pallets against a wall of the kennel. More bags than were being used to feed the dogs were stored in the kennel room (3.1(e)-Storage).

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 15:21

Beach, Ronald

If you view the video please fast-forward to the Ronald Beach section.

Wildlife Sanctuary: eight raccoons, 12 raccoon pups, 12 ducks, two badgers, one fox

The footage relative to this report depicts conditions at Ronald Beach’s USDA licensed facility similar to those documented by a CAPS investigation on 4/1/05.

Raccoon cages
There were about eight cages made entirely of untreated, rusting metal wire used to hold raccoons (3.125(a)-Structural strength). Most of the wire was thin and looked as though it could easily bend. Only one cage appeared to be made of a thicker gauge metal wire. The cages measured about two feet wide, five feet long, and two feet high. Each cage contained wooden boxes about two feet wide, two feet long, and two feet high. There were no windbreaks on these boxes (3.127(b)-Shelter from inclement weather). Most of these cages housed a single adult raccoon, though it evident from the footage that raccoon pups can be not only seen in one cage but heard in another two cages.

Several cages had wooden boards on the floors, and rusting metal sheets partially covered the cage tops (3.125(a)-Structural strength). Each cage had what appeared to be more than two to three weeks of fecal accumulation in and under it (3.131(a)-Sanitation). Metal dishes appeared to have a dingy build-up on their surfaces. A CAPS investigation on 4/1/05 found food and water dishes covered in dirt and algae. The dishes held water, and no food was evident in the cages at all (3.130-Watering) (3.129(a)-Feeding).

Fox and duck enclosures
There were two enclosures in the facility, one holding a single fox and the other holding a duck and about a dozen ducklings. Each was a cylindrical cage made of thick, rusting wire with a dirty floor. The cages were about 15 feet in diameter and six feet high with a flat roof. Each cage had a one-foot-wide wooden pole extending from the floor to the roof in the middle of the cage. These appeared to be the cages that previously held bobcats (see CAPS investigation report 4/1/05). Wooden dog-houses were in each cylinder. They lacked windbreaks on their doorways (3.127(b)-Shelter from the inclement weather). Dirty water dishes and empty food dishes were on the pen floorings (3.130-Watering) (3.129(a)(b)-Feeding).

Badger cages
Two cages made of thin-gauge, rusting metal wire (3.125(a)-Structural strength) each contained a badger. Like the raccoon cages, they were about two feet wide and tall and five feet long. The wooden boxes for shelter lacked windbreaks on their entrances (3.127(b)-Shelter from inclement weather). As with the raccoon cages, there were dirty metal dishes (see CAPS investigation report 4/1/05). The dishes held water, and no food was evident (3.130-Watering) (3.129(a)-Feeding). Two to three weeks worth of fecal accumulation was underneath the cages (3.131-Cleaning of enclosures).

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 15:19

Beach, Ronald

Wildlife Sanctuary: two bobcats, six foxes, one badger, ten raccoons, 15 miniature horses, 20 chickens and five peacocks

All of the animals were located on property behind the owner’s house. The main part of the facility was an area about 300 feet wide and 600 feet long, surrounded by a metal wire fence. There were five free-roaming peacocks inside, and about 20 chickens were in metal cages just inside and outside of the fence (3.133-Separation). The chicken cages were each about two feet wide, two feet long, and a foot high, each housing two to three adult chickens.

The northern end of the property, south of a creek, was fenced in with barbed wire and contained about a dozen miniature horses.

Bobcat enclosures
There were two enclosures in the facility each housing a bobcat. Each was a cylindrical cage made of thick, rusting wire with a dirty floor. The cages were about 15 feet in diameter and six feet high with a flat roof. Each contained a one-foot-wide wooden pole extending from the floor to the roof in the middle of the cage and a wooden box about five feet wide, five feet long, and four feet high. These boxes were accessible through doggie-doors about a foot wide and two feet high with plastic windbreaks. The boxes were made of untreated wood or had peeling paint on the outside surfaces (3.125(a)-Structural strength).

In one cage, a four-foot length of two-by-four lumber was leaning against the wooden pole. There were decaying deer limbs and bones on the floor of the enclosure (3.129(a)-Feeding) and several weeks’ accumulation of feces (3.131(a)-Sanitation).

There was a water dish on the floor of the cage that was filled with dark, dirty water. The dish was so covered in dirt that it was impossible to determine what material it was made of (3.130-Watering).

The second bobcat cage had untreated, thin-gauge wire surrounding the doggie-door with sharp points of the wire protruding out into the pen (3.125(a)-Structural strength).

There was a wooden plank leading up to the doggie-door, and a wooden board about three feet wide and four feet long leaning against a second wooden box about three feet wide, four feet long, and two feet high in the middle of the pen. There was an empty metal bowl on top of the box (3.129(b)-Feeding), and an empty metal dish was located about a foot above the ground on a wire wall. Three decaying deer carcasses were inside the cage (3.129(a)-Feeding).

Raccoon and fox cages
West of the bobcat cages, there were about eight cages made entirely of untreated, thin-gauge, rusting metal wire (3.125(a)-Structural strength).

Each cage was about two feet wide, five feet long, and two feet high. Half of them contained wooden boxes measuring about two feet wide, two feet long, and two feet high. There were no windbreaks on these boxes (3.127(b)-Shelter from inclement weather). Most of these cages housed a single adult fox; one cage had two adult foxes.

A solitary fox in one of these cages was repeatedly running circles around a pile of feces measuring about a foot wide and a foot high in the middle of its cage (3.128-Space requirements).

One of the two foxes in a single cage was running back and forth repeatedly across a wall of the cage while whimpering, then jumped up to stick its nose in a top corner of the cage (3.128-Space requirements).

The other cages had no protection from wind (3.127(b)-Shelter from inclement weather). They each housed a single adult raccoon.

Several cages had wooden boards on the floors, and rusting metal sheets partially covered the cage tops (3.125(a)-Structural strength). Each cage had what appeared to be more than two months’ accumulation of feces in and under the floors (3.131(a)-Sanitation). There were metal food and water dishes in the cages, many of which had algae covering the inner surfaces, and all of the food containers were empty (3.130-Watering) (3.129(a)(b)-Feeding).

Most of the cages were raised about a foot above the ground on wooden beams and cinder blocks. One cage was about a foot above the ground on a base of rusting metal beams (3.125(a)-Structural strength).

Badger cage
Northwest of the bobcat cages and east of the raccoon and fox cages was a metal cage that housed what appeared to be an adult badger. The cage was about four feet wide, eight feet long, and four feet high and was raised about eight inches off the ground on wooden beams. It was made entirely of untreated, rusting, thick-gauge wire (3.125(a)-Structural strength).

There was a wooden plank about four feet long lying of the floor of the cage and a metal sheet, about four feet wide and two feet high, covered in rust at the bottom of one of the walls of the cage (3.125(a)-Structural strength). The badger was lying in a hollowed-out wooden log, about two feet wide and four feet long. There were no windbreaks on the log (3.127(b)-Shelter from inclement weather). The log was not large enough for the badger to turn around (3.128-Space requirements).

There was no food, food dish, or water dish visible in the cage (3.129(a)-Feeding); (3.130 Watering).

Another fox cage
West of the badger cage and north of the fox and raccoon cages was a cage about four feet wide, six feet long, and four feet high that housed a single adult fox. The cage was made of untreated, thin-gauge, rusting wire (3.125(a)-Structural strength).

Straw covered about one-fifth of the wire flooring. There was also a three-foot-long wooden plank, what appeared to be a one-foot-diameter piece of carpeting, and a sheet of wax paper on the cage floor. There was a ceramic water and food dish on the wire floor of the cage that was not placed in a manner that would minimize contamination. (3.129(b)-Feeding).

Several sheets of metal and wood, as well as a plastic bucket, an algae-covered piece of wood, and a metal cat trap were on top of the fox cage. There was no apparent protection from wind (3.127(b)-Shelter from inclement weather). Several weeks’ accumulation of feces was below the pen (3.131(a)-Sanitation).

Another raccoon cage
South of the fox cage was a cage about five feet wide, eight feet long, and five feet high. It was off the ground on wooden beams that rested on cinder blocks. It housed a single adult raccoon.

The cage was made of rusting, thick-gauge wire (3.125(a)-Structural strength). A black tarp covered an area of the flooring measuring three feet by eight feet. There were two wooden logs and a metal water dish on the flooring. No food or food containers were visible in the cage (3.129(a)-Feeding).

A wooden platform, two feet wide and two feet long was built two feet above the cage floor on one of the cage walls. It was constructed of several planks that were covered in algae (3.125(a)-Structural strength).

A wooden box was next to the platform. It was suspended on wooden beams. The box was a foot wide, two feet long, and a foot high with a doggie-door to provide access and a blue tarp for cover. Paint was peeling from the sides of the box (3.125(a)-Structural strength).

Several weeks’ accumulation of feces was underneath the wooden rest and under the cage itself (3.131(a)-Sanitation).

Published in Ohio
Saturday, 31 December 2005 19:00

Petland Undercover Expose

Petland Undercover Expose

This is an undercover expose on Petland (2006).

Published in Ohio
Page 2 of 2

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