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Thursday, 18 October 2012 22:08

Zimmerman, Alvin - Press Release

Alvin Zimmerman
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
Nov. 16, 2007
Department of Agriculture
Commonwealth News Bureau
Room 308, Main Capitol Building
Harrisburg, PA 17120
CONTACT: Nicole L. Cullison
(717) 787-5085

UNION COUNTY KENNEL CHARGED, DOGS SURRENDERED

State Dog Wardens, Humane Officers Remove 29 Dogs from Lewisburg Kennel

HARRISBURG - State dog wardens helped humane officers to recover 29 dogs from an unlicensed Union County facility as part of Governor Edward G. Rendell's effort to crack down on unsatisfactory kennels, the Department of Agriculture said today.

On Nov. 13, state dog wardens visited Fairview kennel in Lewisburg to investigate a complaint about the facility operating without a license. The wardens found 29 of the 40 dogs were dirty, matted and living in unsanitary conditions, including excess fecal matter.

The owner, Alvin Zimmerman, is being charged by the wardens for operating a kennel without a license and failing to maintain sanitary conditions.

Jessie Smith, the state's special deputy for dog law, said any kennel with more than 26 dogs per year must obtain a license and be inspected annually.

"The conditions of the kennel were unsatisfactory and without a license it could not continue to operate," said Smith. "Upon finding evidence of poor sanitation, the wardens immediately contacted humane officers who removed the dogs."

Zimmerman previously held a kennel license, which was surrendered in 2006 due to problems with the kennel, including sanitation and cleaning deficiencies. Following the surrender of his license, Zimmerman voluntarily reduced the number of dogs housed. Smith said sometime between the kennel license revocation in 2006 and the inspection this month, Zimmerman increased the number of dogs at the kennel to more than is allowed by law.

In October 2006, Governor Rendell announced sweeping changes to the state's dog law and regulations. The Governor also took actions to increase the enforcement of current laws by naming Smith as a special deputy, hiring a special prosecutor, and increasing the number of dog wardens.

For more information on Pennsylvania's dog law, and to access kennel inspection records, visit www.agriculture.state.pa.us/padoglaw .

Published in Pennsylvania
Thursday, 18 October 2012 21:54

Kauffman, Dan and Omar

Breeds: Bernese Mountain Dogs, German Shepherds, Standard Poodles, Pomeranian, Miniature Pinscher

There were 22 dogs and 8 puppies at the kennel at the time of investigation.

Kennel description
The kennel was divided into three main sections, a woman who identified herself as a daughter of the kennel owner (Caucasian female, about 25 years old, 120 lbs, long blonde hair, glasses, appeared to be dressed as a Mennonite), said that the kennel was used for breeding and boarding. The horse stable was used to hold horses and dogs in one kennel area; another section was a series of outdoor pens on the opposite side of the stable as the house; and the third area was a row of outdoor pens and elevated cages behind a row of buildings near the house and hidden from view from the house and stables.

 

Stables
The stable building had three German Shepherds in one horse stall and two Shepherd puppies in another stall. Both stalls had no food in them and dirty, brown water in their water dishes. Fecal matter was smashed into straw and wood shavings on the floor, though it appeared that weeks of feces was piled on top of the straw of the puppy pen, much of it mashed into the corners of the pens and smeared onto the walls (PA Dog Law 21.29(a) and(c)(1)-Sanitation) (21.28(d)-Bedding). The Shepherd puppies were each about five months old, and their pen was in almost total darkness (21.27(2)-Lighting). A metal gate was inside the puppies’ stall, with thick cobwebs built up on its top surface (21.29(c)-Sanitation). In addition, the surfaces of a plastic doghouse and a large metal feeder on the ground of the stall were covered in fecal stains (21.29(c)(1)-Sanitation) (21.28(c)-Food). The food dish was clearly not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (21.28(c)-Food).

Poodle puppies
There was an elevated wire cage with an attached wooden hutch used to house six Standard Poodle puppies in the horse barn next to a stall. The puppies had no food, and one of their water dishes had a brown residue covering its surfaces (21.28(a)-Food) (21.28(c)-Water). Several days of feces was piled up on top of wood shavings under the cage (21.29(a)-Sanitation).

Shepherd pens
On the side of the barn opposite the puppy cage was a chain link pen set on the barn flooring which held a single adult Shepherd. The dog had food in a dish set on its flooring and a water dish containing brown water next to it (21.28(a)-Water). Over 24 hours of feces was in the pen, mixed with straw and wood shavings (21.29(a) and (c)(1)-Sanitation) (21.28(d)-Bedding).

A row of chain link pens was near the stable on its side opposite the house on the property. There were five pens, four on concrete slabs and the fifth on dirt. Three pens each held a single German Shepherd, while the other two each held two Shepherds, including the one with the dirt flooring.

Each pen contained a plastic or wooden dog pen, all without windbreaks (21.24(b)(6)(iii)-Shelter). The dirt pen had a plastic doghouse in it about 3.5 feet long and 2.5 feet wide and tall. The doghouse was not large enough for both dogs to stand in at once or lay in without being on top of each other (21.24(b)(1)- Shelter).

None of the pens had any food in them, and plastic water buckets in each were filled with dingy brown and green water (21.28(a) Food) (21.28(a)-Water). Chain link wiring was broken into sharp points next to the water bucket of one pen containing two dogs, and the hole was repaired with rusting chain (21.21(a)-Dog quarters). Over 24 hours of feces was in each pen (21.29(a)-Sanitation).

Bernese pen
Several cages stood by themselves near the horse stable. One was a chain link pen with concrete flooring containing a single Bernese Mountain Dog. The pen contained a wooden doghouse lacking a windbreak and over 24 hours of feces, most of it accumulated in the back of the pen (21.24(b)(6)(iii)-Shelter (21.29(a)-Sanitation). The concrete slab the pen extended about four feet beyond the front of the pen where it was partially covered in standing brown water discolored from excrement (21.24(b)(10) -Shelter).

Outdoor cages
Several other cages were near the Bernese pen. Two were abandoned, elevated cages with mounds of feces piled under them (21.24(b)(10- Shelter). Next to it was another elevated cage containing a German Shepherd puppy about six months old. The cage was attached to a wooden box at its rear and had two water dishes but no food inside (21.28(a)-Food). Feces were smashed into the pen flooring and over a week of feces were piled underneath the cage (21.29(a)-Sanitation). A chain link wire pen with dirt flooring that held two German Shepherds was close to the puppy cage. There was no food in the pen, but I did see two plastic buckets filled with dirty water set next to a chain link wall (21.28(a)-Food) (21.28(a)-Water).

Additional cages
The largest kennel area was not visible from the house or driveway on the property. It was a series of several outdoor enclosures containing dogs of various breeds. One was a chain link pen on dirt ground that held two German Shepherds and a wooden doghouse. There was no food in the pen but there were several water buckets containing brown and green, murky water (PA Dog Law: 21.28(a)-Water).

An elevated outdoor cage holding a Pomeranian and a Miniature Pinscher were near the Shepherd pen with dirt flooring. About a dozen outdoor pens with chain link walls and concrete floorings were next to the elevated cage. Near them was a row of chain link pens with concrete floorings and wooden doghouses, each holding two Standard Poodles. Several days of feces were smashed onto the pen floorings, and all of the dogs’ water buckets contained brown and green water (21.29(a)-Sanitation (21.28(a)-Water).

Several elevated wire cages attached to wooden doghouses were near the ground pens. One held a single Standard Poodle with over 24 hours of feces mashed into the wire flooring of its cage (21.29(a)- Sanitation). Two other cages each held two Standard Poodles.

Immediately after viewing Kauffman Kennels in Chester County, I contacted Denise Dougherty with the PA Dog Law Bureau, telling her that I witnessed what I believed to be a case of animal neglect at Kauffman Kennels. I also said that it was apparent that the kennel is still operating despite the fact that they are listed by the PA Department of Agriculture as being voluntarily closed.

Denise immediately gave me contact information for Maurine Siddons, a Dog Warden in Chester County – 610-909-5666. I left a message for Maurine on 10/24/07 explaining what I had viewed at Kauffman Kennels. On the night of 10/24/07, I e-mailed a short report to her, which is not edited to the current report noting all PA Dog Law violations evident at the time I was at the kennel. In the report to Siddons, I did not cite violations but merely described the conditions I saw, most notably the two German Shepherd puppies on weeks of feces and in a dark horse stall, dogs without food, dirty water buckets, and Poodle cages with feces piled on their floorings.

On 10/26/07 I called Siddons again, who told me that she had already been to Kauffman Kennels and had instructed the kennel owners to give away their dogs. She did not specify where the dogs went. I spoke to Siddons in person at about 8:30 am on 11/1/07 in Harrisburg, PA, where she again commented that Kauffman Kennels had given away their dogs to get them off of the property.

On 11/3/07 I drove by Kauffman Kennels and took several photographs. The kennel area at the rear of the property that used to hold two German Shepherds, several Standard Poodles, and a Miniature Pinscher and Pomeranian appeared to be empty. However, a row of outdoor German Shepherd chain link runs, a Bernese Mountain dog run, and an elevated cage behind the horse stable all appeared to still hold dogs.

Published in Pennsylvania

State of Pennsylania Revokes Kennel License of Joyce Stoltzfus

URL: http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/pets/State_revokes_kennel_license_of_troubled_puppy_broker.html

Publication date: 2009-10-07

Publication name: Philly.com

Headline: State of Pennsylania Revokes Kennel License of Joyce Stoltzfus

Summary: CAPS has been gathering consumer complaints for the puppy mill of Joyce Stoltzfus in Peach Bottom, PA (Lancaster County) for many years.  We have investigated the facility.  Puppy Love Kennel (renamed CC Pets) was the focus of stories CAPS generated with “20/20,” and The Philadelphia Inquirer.  CAPS gathered over a hundred consumer complaints, which resulted in the first settlement with the Office of the Attorney General.  Stoltzfus was fined $35,000.  She continued to violate the laws and CAPS continued to receive complaints.  The Attorney General reached another settlement, this time with a fine of $75,000.

For more information visit: CC Pets / Puppy Love Kennels and the CAPS Investigation Report.
Published in CAPS News
Thursday, 15 November 2007 19:00

Alvin Zimmerman - Press Release - 2007

Alvin Zimmerman

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
Nov. 16, 2007
Department of Agriculture
Commonwealth News Bureau
Room 308, Main Capitol Building
Harrisburg, PA 17120
CONTACT: Nicole L. Cullison
(717) 787-5085


 

UNION COUNTY KENNEL CHARGED, DOGS SURRENDERED

State Dog Wardens, Humane Officers Remove 29 Dogs from Lewisburg Kennel

HARRISBURG - State dog wardens helped humane officers to recover 29 dogs from an unlicensed Union County facility as part of Governor Edward G. Rendell's effort to crack down on unsatisfactory kennels, the Department of Agriculture said today.

On Nov. 13, state dog wardens visited Fairview kennel in Lewisburg to investigate a complaint about the facility operating without a license. The wardens found 29 of the 40 dogs were dirty, matted and living in unsanitary conditions, including excess fecal matter.

The owner, Alvin Zimmerman, is being charged by the wardens for operating a kennel without a license and failing to maintain sanitary conditions.

Jessie Smith, the state's special deputy for dog law, said any kennel with more than 26 dogs per year must obtain a license and be inspected annually.

"The conditions of the kennel were unsatisfactory and without a license it could not continue to operate," said Smith. "Upon finding evidence of poor sanitation, the wardens immediately contacted humane officers who removed the dogs."

Zimmerman previously held a kennel license, which was surrendered in 2006 due to problems with the kennel, including sanitation and cleaning deficiencies. Following the surrender of his license, Zimmerman voluntarily reduced the number of dogs housed. Smith said sometime between the kennel license revocation in 2006 and the inspection this month, Zimmerman increased the number of dogs at the kennel to more than is allowed by law.

In October 2006, Governor Rendell announced sweeping changes to the state's dog law and regulations. The Governor also took actions to increase the enforcement of current laws by naming Smith as a special deputy, hiring a special prosecutor, and increasing the number of dog wardens.

For more information on Pennsylvania's dog law, and to access kennel inspection records, visit www.agriculture.state.pa.us/padoglaw .

Published in CAPS News
Sunday, 28 October 2007 20:00

Zimmerman, Ezra

Breeds: Bichon Frises, Shih Tzus, Cocker Spaniels, Yorkshire Terriers, West Highland Terriers, Chihuahuas, Dachshunds

There were about 12 dogs and an unknown number of puppies in the kennel at the time of investigation.

Location and description
“Zimmerman’s Kennel” is noted as being located at 11965 State Route 304 in Mifflinburg, PA, though I found the kennel on the opposite side of the highway at 11900 State Route 304. I spoke to a Mennonite woman at 11965 who told me to go to 11900 to get dogs, where I met a man who identified himself as Ezra Zimmerman.

Ezra Zimmerman’s kennel was inside a building, with rows of elevated cages inside. Each cage contained two to three dogs of various small breeds. I was able to observe only about half of the dogs closely, though low light and dogs huddling in the backs of their cages or jumping frantically made it difficult to clearly view many of the dogs I did see.

Four rows of cages were arranged into two sets of rows, with each set containing having two rows back-to-back with each other. There were two to three dogs per cage in each of the cages in these rows, with about 10 cages per row. The cages were constructed with wooden beams to act as frames and plastic-coated wire on all sides. All of the cages in the kennel had plastic self-feeders and automatic water spigots.

Shih Tzu with infected eye
In one cage in the row closest to office space of the kennel were two shaved Shih Tzu breeders. One had a green and clear discharge from its left eye. The eyelids never completely opened and the dog constantly blinked the eye, indicating an eye infection (PA Dog Law 21.30-Condition of dog).

Bichon Frises
Another cage in the same row held three Bichon Frise breeders. All of them had hair loss on their paws, where bare pink skin was evident (21.30-Condition of dog).

Another row of about a dozen cages was used to hold whelping dogs and puppies, arranged against a wall in the kennel room that met the office area from where the kennel was accessed. Four more whelping cages were also in the office area; they were set against its wall opposite the doorway accessing the kennel from the outdoors. Each whelping cage had a fully enclosed whelping on its rear accessible via a doggie-door. One whelping cage held a single adult Bichon Frise covered in matted fur. A large clump of dried feces was stuck to the dog’s hindquarters (21.30-Condition of dog).

Published in Pennsylvania
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 21:28

Zimmerman, Alvin

Breeds: Cocker Spaniels, Poodles, Cock-a-poos

There were an unknown number of dogs in the kennel at the time of investigation.

Kennel still operating
Fairview kennels is listed as being voluntarily closed. I spoke to kennel owner Alvin Zimmerman who said he is still breeding Cocker Spaniels to Poodles to sell Cock-a-Poo puppies to a place he called Jack’s Dog Farm.

I could hear several dogs barking from his kennel building, though Alvin would not let me inside of it. When I asked to see puppies from it, he ran quickly to get them before coming out with them, presumably so I couldn’t walk behind him and stand at the kennel doorway. I was able to see from a window at a wall to the kennel that dried feces were mounded up below two unoccupied cages from which fur and feces were hanging. The building was too dark for me to see anything beyond the two cages directly next to the window.

On 10/31/07 I gave a copy of video footage obtained at Zimmerman’s property to Special Deputy Secretary Jessie Smith. We discussed my findings. I became aware on 11/16/07 that on 11/13/07 PA Dog Law had raided Zimmerman’s property through a press release:

Published in Pennsylvania
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 21:09

Wenger, Eugene L.

Approximately 22 dogs and three puppies. Breeds: Pomeranians, Beagles, Shiba Inus, Cocker Spaniels, Jack Russell Terriers

First row of cages
The kennel structure closest to the driveway consisted of three cages in a row; the cage doors faced from the driveway. Each cage was about 2.5 feet long, two feet wide, and two feet high. They had a wooden box about the same size at the rear, which was accessible by a doggy door with plastic flaps. There were heating lamps. The cage closest to the road had three Shiba Inus, which appeared to be about six months old.

These cages were constructed with wooden beams at their corners and had untreated, thin-gauge, rusting wire for their walls and roofs (3.1(c)(1)(i)-Surfaces) (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures) treated wire for their floorings. The cages were about 2.5 feet above the ground on wooden stilts. The wooden beams of the cages were painted white; the paint was peeling over much of their surfaces (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces). The outside of the wooden boxes were painted white as well. Each cage was also accessible by a door on its outside wall. All of the cages were covered by a sloped metal roof.

Second group of cages
Within 15 feet of the first row of cages and closer to the road was another kennel structure with two rows of six cages. One row faced the Shiba Inu cage in the first row of cages previously described, and the other row faced the road. These cages were the same size and construction as the first row of cages described except that there was no windbreaks on the doggy door entrances (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements). One row of cages in this group housed one adult dog per cage, including five Shiba Inus and one Cocker Spaniel, each of which had a collar and tag around its neck. All of the Shiba Inus had less than six inches of space between their heads and the tops of their cages (3.6(c)(1)(iii)-Primary enclosures). The second row of cages in this group house two Shiba Inus, a Pomeranian, a Jack Russell Terrier, and a Pug. There was one dog per cage, and each dog had a collar and metal tag around its neck.

All of the wood of these structures was painted red; however, the paint was worn away and peeling off (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces). There was a door in the wire wall of each cage, and a sloped metal roof supported by wooden trusses covered both rows of cages. Underneath each row of cages was a plastic sheet for catching debris, which was covered in brown fecal stains (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces).

Third group of cages
Within five feet of the second group of cages and closer to the road was a third structure with three cages. Each cage was about three feet long, wide, and high and was constructed with wooden beams at the corners, treated and untreated thick and thin-gauge wiring, and chain link for walls and roofs (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures). One cage contained an adult Pug and two adult Pomeranians, another contained two adult Shiba Inu, and the third contained an adult Shiba Inu and an adult Beagle. One of the Pomeranians, which was a golden-brown color and appeared to weigh about four pounds, had thick mats covering its fur (2.40-Vet Care). Each dog had a collar with a metal tag around its neck.

These cages were raised about two feet above the ground on wooden stilts. Plastic boxes were at the back of each cage and lacked windbreaks on their entrances (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements). Plastic boards three feet long and 1.5 feet high were between each cage. These boards, as well as the outside walls of the dog houses, were covered in dirt build-up (3.1(c)(3)-Cleaning). Each cage had an access door facing the direction of the road, and the metal hinges on the doors were rusting (3.1(c)(1)(i)-Surfaces). Underneath the cages, a layer of metal boards placed within half an inch of each other ran the length and width of the cages to catch debris. Below those boards was a sheet of wooden boards set within inches of the ground. The boards were covered in fecal stains, clumps of fur, and feces and debris build up (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). A metal roof covered the entire structure, sloping downward towards the back of the dog houses.

Fourth group of cages
Within five feet of the third group of cages and closer to the road was a structure containing three outdoor cages and connecting dog houses. Each cage was about three feet long, two feet wide, and three feet high. They had wooden boards on their corners, untreated, thin-gauge wire for their walls and roofs (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures) and treated wire for their floorings. The plywood dog houses at the back of each cage appeared to be of the same dimensions as the cages. A plastic wall with metal doggy door separated each dog house and cage. There were two adult Beagles in each of two cages, and each dog had a collar and metal tag around its neck. No dogs were in the third cage.

Wooden stilts raised these cages about a foot above the ground. The wooden beams on the cages were painted white, though most of the paint was worn away and peeling (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces). Algae build-up was on the wooden boards (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces).

Each cage had an access door in the cage wall facing the road, and the hinges to the doors were rusting (3.1(c)(1)(i)-Surfaces).

Plastic sheets about a foot high and three feet long separated each cage. These sheets, as well as the plastic outside walls of the dog houses, were covered with fecal stains and dirt build-up (3.1(c)(3)-Cleaning). Six inches underneath the cages was a sheet of plastic that ran their combined length and width. This sheet was covered with feces and algae stains (3.1(c)(2)- Surfaces) (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Published in Pennsylvania
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 20:50

Weaver, Ammon

Breeds: Jack Russell Terriers, Dachshunds, Cairn Terriers, Labradors, Shih Tzus

There were about 25 dogs and 10 puppies in the kennel at the time of investigation.

Outdoor cages
The kennel's structure was identical as noted in CAPS investigation report for 2/23/05. Ammon Weaver was putting wood stain on the outdoor cages when I met him, and it was obvious that the wooden frames of the cages were wet with stain. The dogs’ paws were also covered with the stain from jumping against the wood and pressing their paws against the door frames. The toenails of all the dogs extended underneath their wire floorings as they walked (USDA: 2.40-Vet care; PA Dog Law: 21.30- Condition).

Each cage had either two dogs or a single nursing dog and a litter of puppies. The cage furthest from the entrance contained two Labs and a Jack Russell. The outdoor cages were each about four feet tall and wide and about five feet long, while the indoor enclosures, accessible via dog doors, were only about 3.5 feet tall and long, and four feet wide. I saw one of the Labs standing in its indoor enclosure when Ammon opened up the wooden door accessing it; the Lab had less than six inches of space from the top of its head to the top of the enclosure (USDA: 3.6(c)(1)(i)- Space; PA Dog Law: 21.23(d)- Space).

It did not seem as though both Labs, each about four feet long from the tips of their noses to the bases of their tails, could stand or lie in the indoor cage with the Jack Russell at once. It was unlikely that the dogs were able to move about freely or avoid constant contact with each other (USDA: 3.6(c)(1)(iii)-Space; PA Dog Law: 21.23(a) and (b)-Space). As I observed the outdoor cage containing the Labs and Jack Russell, I said to Ammon, "There's a bunch in there." He replied, "Yeah, my inspector don't care about that."

Indoor cages
The indoor cages had plastic self feeders attached to their doors and automatic water spigots ran into them from the ceiling. Ammon explained to me that he puts enough food per feeder to last the dogs three to four days (USDA: 3.9(a)- Feeding; PA Dog Law: 21.28(a)-Food).

The kennel contained two rooms, both which contained the indoor enclosures. The first room, which the single kennel doorway accessed, also held kennel supplies and food. Supplies such as canned food, tools, and medicine were stored on top of the indoor wooden boxes throughout the room.

Dachshund cages
The second room had two elevated cages on the wall opposite the indoor enclosures. Each cage was about six feet wide and two feet long and tall, with wooden frames, wire walls, and treated wire floorings. There were three Dachshunds per cage, each with a plastic self-feeder and metal water dish. Plastic sheeting ran along the back wall underneath the cages and curved forwards to catch debris. The wall and flooring sides of the sheeting were coated in fecal stains (USDA: 3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces; PA Dog Law: 21.29(c)- Sanitation).

The stack of three wire cages with untreated wire floorings noted in CAPS USDA report 2/23/05 were all empty. I asked Ammon if the cages were useful for weaning, and he said his inspector made him stop using them because of their untreated floorings.

Published in Pennsylvania
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 20:47

Weaver, Ammon

Approximately 20 dogs and five puppies. Breeds: Labradors, Cairn Terriers, Jack Russell Terriers

Ammon Weaver’s kennel building, about 40 feet long and 15 feet wide, had an interior constructed entirely of plywood, a concrete floor, and artificial lighting throughout. The kennel was accessible by a doorway on one 40 foot wall that faced away from the house.

Whelping pen
Two rooms were visible during the inspection. One room was a 40-foot-long, five-foot-wide hallway with a row of cages that had doggie-doors accessing outside cages. It was not possible to see inside these cages except for one wooden whelping pen in the row of cages.

This pen was about four feet wide, four feet long, and three feet high. The door accessing the pen was a foot wide and three feet high. Inside the pen were five Cairn Terriers about four-weeks-old

There was a space underneath this pen about four feet wide, four feet long, and a foot high. In this space was a heating lamp facing up towards the wooden flooring of the pen. A light bulb at the roof of the pen was connected to a dimmer switch near the pen door.

A metal food dish was on the saw dust-covered floor (3.9-Feeding). On top of the whelping box were more than a dozen medicine and cleaning bottles, as well as several plastic bags (3.1(b)-Condition and site).

Second kennel room
The second room was about seven feet wide and ten feet long with a vertical bank of three cages, each about 1.5 feet wide in all dimensions. The cages had metal water dishes and self-feeders. The walls, roofs, and floorings of these cages were made of untreated, thin-gauge metal (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures). The top and bottom cages housed an adult Jack Russell Terrier about 15 pounds in weight (3.6(c)(1)(i) Primary enclosures).

Metal sheets were positioned a few inches under each one of these cages. There was several days’ accumulation of feces under each occupied cage (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Outside cages
There were ten outside cages in a row along a 40 foot wall of the kennel next to the kennel doorway. Each cage was about 3.5 feet wide, four feet long, and 3.5 feet high and made with wooden beams at the corners, untreated, thin-gauge wire for walls and roof, and treated wire for the floor. A door about two feet wide and three feet high accessed each cage from the outside. There was an adult Cairn Terrier in the outside cage. This cage was connected to the whelping pen housing the five Cairn Terrier puppies.

Several cages housing one to two adult Jack Russell Terriers or Cairn Terriers were too small for the dogs inside of them. One cage housed an adult Cairn Terrier and an adult Yellow Labrador weighing about 65 pounds (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures). Another housed an adult Jack Russell Terrier and two adult Chocolate Labradors, each weighing about 70 pounds (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures). The pen furthest from the doorway housed an adult Jack Russell Terrier and two adult Yellow Labradors, one weighing about 80 pounds and the other about 65 pounds (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures.) The ground under these cages sloped downhill from the kennel doorway. Thus the cage closest to the door was raised about two feet off above the ground on wooden stilts while the cage furthest from the doorway was raised about four feet above the ground.

Feces stains covered the metal siding of the kennel building under each cage, and a concrete slab four feet wide and 35 feet long under the cages was covered with clumps of fur (3.1(c)(3)-Cleaning). The concrete also exhibited more than a week’s accumulation of feces (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). The slab sloped away from the kennel building toward a wooden beam that contained debris from the grass beyond the cages.

A watering system of PVC pipes fed a spigot inside each cage. It was not evident if metal bowls in the outdoor cages were used for feeding or watering.

Published in Pennsylvania
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 20:08

Stoltzfus, Joyce

Approximately 300 dogs and puppies. Breeds: Pekingese, Puggles, Pit Bull Terriers, Golden Retrievers, Beagles, Cock-a-poos, Boxers, various mixed breeds

Puppy Love Kennel had two separate facilities, one of indoor pens housing puppies only, and another of outdoor pens housing adult dogs and puppies.

Indoor puppy pens
These pens were inside a wooden barn about 25 feet wide and 40 feet long. The barn had a peaked roof, a doorway accessing it on one side, and five puppy pens on each of its longer sides. There was artificial lighting and concrete flooring in the barn.

Each pen measured about eight feet long and eight feet wide, with four-foot-tall wooden walls between pens and on the hallway-side of each pen. There were about a dozen puppies in each pen, each about eight to twelve weeks old and of varying breeds, including Pit Bull Terriers, Puggles, German Shepherds, Beagles, and various mixed breeds.

Each of the hallway walls had a sliding wooden doorway with a metal latch on the outside. Metal bars ran from the top of each wall to the ceiling. One side of the hallway had several bags of wood shavings piled up against it in three different places. The pens themselves had a layer of wooden shavings several inches thick thrown over their floors. More than 24 hours’ accumulation of feces was evident, as dried feces were visible in the shavings that had been thrown over old feces and urine not removed.

Each pen contained two plastic food dishes, a foot in diameter and four inches deep. They were filled to their tops with about three days’ worth of food for each pen and covered with a tan powder. Plastic water dishes in each pen were filled with murky brown water.

One black German Shepherd puppy, less than two pounds in weight, appeared emaciated. The stomach appeared sucked in and its ribs, spine, and hips clearly visible under its taught skin. One pen contained a white Pit Bull puppy, which appeared to weigh two pounds. The puppy appeared lethargic, convulsed slightly as though it was coughing, and had thick green mucous draining from its eyes and nostrils. The puppy’s eyes were nearly swollen shut, and it did not move at all while observed for several minutes, other than turning its head from side to side.

Outdoor pens
The other part of this kennel, within a hundred feet of the puppy barn, consisted of several rows of outdoor pens surrounded by a six-foot-high chain link fence about 60 feet long and 40 feet wide. The chain link sections surrounding the outdoor rows had green plastic strips set in them which blocked view into the compound from the outside.

Each row had ten adjacent pens, each measuring about seven feet long, three feet wide, and four feet high. Each cage was made of chain link wiring with the back two feet of each cage enclosed in wood with a doggy door framed in metal allowing access between these sections. Each cage contained five to eight dogs of various breeds and ages. Pekingese, Boxers, Golden Retrievers, Lhasa Apsos, Beagles, Basset Hounds, German Shepherds, Australian Cattle Dogs, Maltese, Jack Russell Terriers, American Eskimos, and various mixed breeds were present. All of the dogs with white fur had yellow stains in their fur, and many dogs had wet fur.

The first row of pens against a 40-foot section of the privacy fence had the sides with chain-link doors facing to the inside of the compound. The second row of pens faced the first, the third row backed to the second row, and the fourth row faced the third row. Two rows of cages that faced each other had another row of four cages in a perpendicular row between them.

All were raised above the ground by two-foot-high wooden stilts and had treated wire flooring. Wooden beams framed the bottoms of the pens. All of the wood was painted red, with paint peeling in many areas and revealing a white coating underneath. The metal bars at the bottom of the chain link walls were all rusting. One pen, containing two Boxers and a Lhasa Apso mix, had its front chain link wall separated from the metal bar at its base. Metal sheets were used as roofs over the pens. There were several lights placed on the roofs of the kennel rows, with wiring running along the roofs of the pens. The walls with the doggy doors were covered with while plastic sheeting that had brown stains.

Each cage had a black plastic water bucket attached to its front chain-link door. A water spigot was in inside the kennel, with a water hose strewn across the ground. About three inches of snow and ice were on the ground of this kennel at the time of investigation.

The pens themselves were over concrete flooring, and there were several days’ accumulation of feces under them. There was bright and dark blood as well as mucous in the feces under several cages. One row of cages facing into the compound had the flooring below it raised up about 45 degrees so that urine and runny feces would wash down away from it, though large piles of feces were resting on the grade itself.

Sick, wet, dirty dogs
Several of the dogs and puppies in the outside pens were sick. One was a black German Shepherd mix weighing about 35 pounds with hair loss around its eyes. Another was an Australian Cattle dog puppy, about two months old and weighing about 25 pounds, that had thick green mucous build-up around its right eye and draining from its nostrils.

Two Maltese mixes, each weighing about ten pounds, had dirt and feces covering their soaked and yellow-stained fur. Another pen, containing about five dogs that each weighed about ten pounds, housed a black Poodle mix with large fur mats covering the dog’s face and body.

A black Cock-a-poo puppy weighing about five pounds had thick green mucous discharge from its nostrils. There were four other puppies in the pen with the sick Cock-a-poo, including three mixed-breed puppies each weighing about five to eight pound and a Boxer puppy weighing about 15 pounds.

In one pen was a Boxer weighing about 50 pounds, whose right eye was nearly swollen shut and draining a clear discharge. A Lhasa Apso mix weighing about 15 pounds had long curved toenails and severely matted fur around its face so that its eyes could not be seen and its nose was barely distinguishable.

Several other pens contained dogs and puppies of significantly different weights, such as one pen which housed a 40-pound Corgi mix, a 45-pound short-haired mixed breed, and a Jack Russell mix weighing about 25 pounds.

In several pens, the number and/or size of the dogs precluded all of the dogs occupying the boxes at the backs of their cages at one time and lying in a normal manner or turning about freely. For example, pens housed five dogs that each weighed 25 to 35 pounds, and other pens housed six to eight dogs that were five to 15 pounds in weight.

Published in Pennsylvania
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