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Publication/Event date: 2013-05-14
Publication name: Examiner.com
URL for more info: http://www.examiner.com/article/ariel-castro-s-dogs-impounded-and-still-suffering-under-fbi-hold
Summary:
In any major crime case, such as the Ariel Castro case, the human victims are naturally the focus. But what about animals, the other sentient beings, caught up in a front-page nightmare?

Ariel Castro, the Cleveland man charged with kidnapping, raping and torturing three missing women for ten years, owned dogs. "At least four dogs were impounded in connection to the Castro arrest," said a police source close to the investigation who did not want his name used. He said the dogs were brought to the city kennel.

Continue reading…

Published in CAPS News
Publication/Event date: 2012-12-18
Publication name: Examiner.com
URL for more info: http://www.examiner.com/article/the-sad-failure-of-ohio-s-legislators-to-protect-pets
Summary:
What do seven Ohio companion animal bills all have in common?

They all dealt with animal cruelty and they all died in the 129th General Assembly over the past twelve months!

Ohio legislators have epically failed the state’s companion animals this year. Seven bills seeking to protect them and to strengthen animal welfare laws were introduced and all seven expired without a final hearing and vote.

Continue reading... 
Published in CAPS News
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 21:27

Yoder, Vernon

Approximately 16 dogs and no puppies. Breeds: Cairn Terriers, Shiba Inus, Boston Terriers, German Shepherds, Pomeranians, Toy Fox Terriers

Yoder’s kennel consisted of several outdoor German Shepherd pens, an outdoor Shiba Inu pen, and a kennel building for smaller breed dogs.

Kennel building
The kennel building was about eight feet wide and ten feet long with single door. It had five cages on each of its longer walls. Windows provided some lighting, and there was a heater inside the kennel. The cages were adjacent in rows and raised about 2.5 feet above the ground. One row had outdoor and indoor cages, connected by metal doggie-doors. The other row had only indoor cages. Each cage, indoor and outdoor, was about 1.5 feet wide, two feet long, and 1.5 feet high and made entirely of treated wire. Metal feeders were attached to the inside walls of the cages, and water spigots were directed into each indoor cage.

Two of the cages each housed a single Shiba Inu, about 18 inches long. These cages gave the dogs less than six inches of space between the tops of their heads and the tops of the cages (3.6(c)(1)(iii)-Primary enclosures).

Two of the indoor cages each housed a single Toy Fox Terrier. The remaining cages housed dogs measuring about 15 inches long: one housed a single Boston Terrier, another housed a Cairn Terrier, and another housed both a Boston Terrier and a Cairn Terrier (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures).

The plastic walls at the backs of the indoor cages and the doggie doors were stained with feces (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces). Plastic sheets were about four inches below each row of indoor cages. These sheets had feces stains with mucous and blood, indicative of coccidiosis (2.40-Vet care).

The outdoor cages each had more than two weeks’ accumulation of feces below them (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Wooden boards, a plastic stepping stool, a plastic shelf, and various medicine bottles were stored on top of the indoor cages (3.1(e)-Storage).

Outdoor Shiba Inu pen
The outside Shiba Inu pen was about three feet wide and 15 feet long. It had a dirty floor (3.1(c)(3)-Cleaning) and untreated, thick-gauge wire walls about 3.5 feet high (3.6(a)(xii)-Primary enclosures). The pen housed a single Shiba Inu. There was a water dish full of ice (3.10-Watering) and a food dish placed on the pen flooring in a manner that did not minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). The dog house was a plastic barrel about 1.5 feet wide and three feet long; it had no windbreak on its entrance (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements).

Outdoor German Shepard pens
There were two outdoor German Shepherd pens, each about eight feet wide and 20 feet long. These pens had dirt floors and untreated, thick-gauge wire walls about five feet high (3.6(a)(xii)-Primary enclosures). Each pen had a single German Shepherd. The dogs had plastic water buckets full of ice (3.10-Watering) and a food dishes placed on the ground in a manner that did not minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). Each pen had a wooden dog house about three feet wide, four feet long, and three feet high that lacked windbreaks on the entrances (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements).

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 21:23

Yoder, Naomi and Myron

Approximately 34 dogs. Breeds: Pomeranians, Shih Tzu, Bichon Frises, St. Bernards, Standard Poodles, Pug First kennel building Two of the kennel areas of this facility had indoor/outdoor pens connected by a metal doggy door. The first kennel building was about 15 feet long and eight feet wide, with wooden walls and a shingled, peaked roof. Each long side of this building had six outdoor cages in a row that were raised about a foot above the ground on PVC pipes. PVC piping framed the bottom of these outdoor cages, and walls were made of treated thin-gauge wire.. Each cage was about two feet long, three feet wide, and two feet high and housed two dogs of various breeds, including Pomeranians, Shih Tzu, and Bichon Frises. Plastic sheeting placed underneath each cage to catch feces and debris was angled sharply to about six inches above the ground. These, sheets were feces-stained (3.1(c)(1)-Housing facilities, general – Surfaces). Outdoor pens Within 15 feet of the first kennel building and in the opposite direction of the Yoder house was a row of three outdoor pens in a row. Each pen was about 40 feet long and 20 feet wide. They had five-foot-tall chain link walls reinforced with wooden beams. Snow covered the ground in these pens, and several trees with thin trunks were growing in them. The pen closest to the kennel building housed two adult Poodles and an adult Labrador. This pen contained two, blue plastic barrels each about 3.5 feet long and two feet wide and a wooden dog house about three feet long, 2.5 feet wide, and three feet high.. None of these enclosures had windbreaks (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements). The barrels were not large enough for one of these dogs to occupy or lie in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements). The adjacent pen, housing two adult St. Bernard dogs contained a plastic dog house measuring about 3.5 feet long, three feet wide and 3.5 feet high. This dog house had no windbreak on its entrance (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements) and was not large enough for both of the dogs to occupy at once and lie in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements). The third outdoor pen, housing two adult Poodles and one St. Bernard, contained a similar dog house (same size with no windbreak on its entrance). Again, the dog house was not large enough for all of the dogs in the pen to occupy at once and lie in a normal manner or turn about freely. Each of these pens contained a plastic self feeder attached to a chain link wall, and a plastic, five-gallon bucket for water placed near the self feeder. The self feeder, positioned within about four inches of the ground, was not placed in a manner so as to minimize contamination by excreta or pests (3.9(b)-Feeding). Second kennel building Within 15 feet of the last outdoor pen was another kennel structure. This building contained four, indoor/outdoor pens in a row. The outdoor cages, raised about 1.5 feet above the ground with wooden stilts, were constructed with wooden beams at their corners, untreated, thin-gauge, rusting wire walls and roofs (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures), and treated thin-gauge wire floorings. One cage housing an adult Pug was about three feet long, wide, and high. Broken pieces of wire protruded into this cage (3.6(a)(2)(i)-Primary enclosures). A wooden box in this cage was about two feet long and three feet wide and tall. Next to the Pug’s cage was a cage housing an adult St. Bernard weighing about 65 pounds. This cage was about four feet by three feet and contained a wooden box about two feet long, four feet wide, and three feet high (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Space). The other two cages in this group, similar in size to the one containing the Pug, were unoccupied. There were no windbreaks on the boxes in these pens (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements). The wooden beams on these cages had peeling-paint surfaces (3.1(c)(2)- Surfaces) The occupied cages had plastic food dishes on the floor that were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). The Pug’s cage had a metal water dish, and the St. Bernard’s cage had a gallon-sized plastic water bucket; both were filled with solid ice (3.10-Watering). The front walls of the box enclosures in the occupied cages were covered in feces stains and dirt build-up (3.1(c)(3)-Surfaces). There was several days’ accumulation of feces under these cages (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).
Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 21:22

Yoder, Mose - Triple Creek Farm

Approximately 10 dogs. Breeds: Pugs, Miniature Pinschers

This kennel was in a barn about 60 feet long and 30 feet wide with metal walls, a peaked metal roof, and concrete flooring. There were 12 dog pens in a row, each with inside and outside cages connected by plastic doggy doors framed in wood. The inside pens were about 3.5 feet long, two feet wide, and three feet high, had wooden beams along the bottoms of the pens, rusting, thin-gauge wire for walls, and no roofs. Each dog pen contained a single adult Pug or Miniature Pinscher, each of which had a bronze tag hanging from a collar around its neck.

Each inside cage contained a dog house, about 1.5 feet long, wide, and high, made of untreated wood. The corners of the dog houses were chewed and broken in several places (3.1(c)(1)- Surfaces). There was straw and wood chips on the flooring of the cages and more than 24 hours’ accumulation of feces in each inside pen (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Each cage had a metal or plastic food dish placed on the floor (3.9(b)-Feeding). The water dishes contained ice (3.2(a)-Heating, cooling and temperature) (3.10-Watering).

A wooden board against the inside of the barn wall and about four feet above the flooring of one cage had a white, plastic five-gallon bucket on top of it with a wooden board about a foot wide and long on top of it (3.1(b)-Condition and site).

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 21:16

Yoder, Andy

Approximately 33 dogs and two puppies; seven of the dogs were Beagles that the owner’s wife said were for hunting and not breeding. Breeds: Scottish Terriers, Pomeranians, Beagles, Cairn Terriers, Shiba Inus, Boston Terriers

Barn with indoor/outdoor pens
The kennel consisted of several structures. The largest was a single-story building 12 feet long and five feet wide. It had plastic siding, tile roof, a single door with a window providing access on one five-foot wall, and a window on the opposite five foot wall. There were four pens on each longer side of the barn. Each pen consisted of an indoor and outdoor cage, connected by wooden doggie-doors.

The outdoor cages were each about 2.5 feet long, wide, and high and constructed entirely of treated wire. They were set about three above the ground and had plastic sheeting a foot beneath them supported by PVC piping to catch feces and debris. There was more than 24 hours’ accumulation of feces and standing puddles of partially frozen urine on these sheets (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). More than two weeks’ accumulation of feces was below the plastic sheets, and strands of fur and feces were hanging from underneath the plastic sheets and wire floorings (3.11(a)-Cleaning or primary enclosures). The plastic siding of the building underneath the cages was covered in fecal stains and had bits of feces and fur stuck to it (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces). The PVC piping underneath the cages ran down to the ground and along the wall of the kennel building itself. Thick feces accumulation was caked between the piping and the building (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

One corner outdoor cage had a cage flooring made of two wire sheets that met in the middle of the cage, where the flooring sagged about three inches lower than the rest of the floor so that the floor itself had a large trench in it (3.1(a)-Structure; construction) (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures). The outside wall of this cage facing away from the owners’ driveway had a piece of untreated thin-gauge wire between the top of the cage and the treated wire of the wall (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures). Sharp points of this untreated wire protruded into the cage itself (3.1(c)(1)(ii)-Surfaces).

A lix-it watering system fed each outside cage, though each cage also had a plastic water dish in it that was full of ice (3.10-Watering). A pen housing a whelping Shiba Inu mother and her puppy, who was about two weeks old, had a brick holding down the cage flooring at one of its outside corners (3.1(b)-Condition and site) (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures).

The four indoor cages along each 12-foot barn wall were each about 2.5 feet long, wide, and high and were raised about a foot above the wooden barn floor. Each cage contained two to four dogs, with each dog being about 10 to 25 pounds in weight. Two cages each contained two adult Pomeranians and two adult Boston Terriers (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures).

These cages had plastic sides and floorings, though the walls facing the inside of the kennel were made of painted, treated thin-gauge wire. Some of the indoor cages had roofs made of painted, thin-gauge wire, some had no roofs. The painted wire was peeling in all of the cages (3.1(c)(2)-Maintenance and replacement of surfaces).

The thin-gauge wire roof of a pen that contained a whelping Shiba Inu mother and a puppy about two weeks old was untreated and rusting (3.1(c)(1)(i)-Surfaces). This roof had two wire sheets that met in the middle, where sharp pieces of wire protruded down into the cage (3.1(c)(1)(ii)-Surfaces). The Shiba Inu mother had several scars on the top of her muzzle, possibly caused by the sharp wire.

Paper cards with what appeared to be the names and birthdates of the dogs hung inside plastic sheets on the wire wall of each cage. One of the cards appeared to be a piece of thin cardboard secured to the top of a cage with a zip tie.

Some cages had plastic food bowls on the cage floorings, while others had plastic self feeders attached to the wall within a couple inches of the floor. None of the food containers were placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding).

Several cages included painted-wood whelping boxes about a foot long, a foot wide, and several inches deep. Paint was worn away from the boxes in several areas, and the box edges were chewed (3.1(c)(2)-Maintenance and replacement of surfaces) In one cage, the whelping box partially covered a six-inch hole in the outside wall, leaving exposure to the outdoors (3.1(a)-Structure; construction)

All of the surfaces inside all of the cages had dirt and feces buildup, many with the white-painted surfaces completely covered with feces buildup. Obviously there was more than 24 hours’ accumulation of feces in each cage (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

The barn floor between the cages was covered with dirt and mud and appeared to not have been cleaned in more a day (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces). Lighting in the kennel was provided by windows on each shorter wall of the building, one on the door and another on the opposite wall. Each window was about 1.5 feet high and a foot wide. Below the window on the wall opposite the doorway was a heater that was turned on.

Circular pen
About 40 feet from side of the barn away from the driveway was a pen containing two adult Shiba Inus. The pen was circular, 30 feet in diameter, and fenced with seven-foot-high untreated, thick-gauge rusting fencing (3.1(c)(1)(i)-Surfaces).

Inside was a rusting-metal self feeder on the ground that was not in a manner that would minimize contamination by excreta or pests (3.9-Feeding). Also in the pen was a rusting-metal barrel about four feet long and two feet wide with no windbreak on its entrance (3.1(c)(1(i)-Surfaces) (3.4(b)(3)-Shelter from the elements). This barrel was not large enough for one of the Shiba Inus to be inside and lie in a normal manner or turn about freely (3.4(b)-Shelter from the elements). A wooden branch about 10 feet long was resting unsecured against the barrel and the top of the metal wall (3.1(a)-Structure, construction). A plastic dish on the ground that was about six inches high and wide was filled with ice (3.10-(Watering). There was no spot in this pen where for the dogs could stand or lie down without being on snow (3.4(a)(2)-Shelter from the elements). There was no dry bedding in the dog house or on the ground of the pen (3.4(b)(4)-Shelter from the elements).

Beagle pens
The rest of the kennel consisted of outdoor pens for Beagles. These pens were located between the barn and the driveway accessing the property. Andy Yoder’s wife said that their Beagles were for hunting only.

One of the enclosures consisted of two adjacent wooden cages, each about two feet wide, four feet long, and two feet high and raised about two feet above the ground on wooden stilts. There were two Beagles in each cage. The cages had wooden beams at the corners and wire walls and floorings. There was more than two weeks’ accumulation of feces under each cage.

Three additional pens consisted of dog houses made of untreated wood; each had a Beagle chained to a stake with about ten feet of chain. The dog houses had no windbreaks on their entrances and had food and water dishes set on the ground near them in a manner that would not minimize contamination by excreta.

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 21:12

Yoder, Aden

Approximately 12 dogs and no puppies. Breeds: Miniature Pinschers, Chihuahuas, Toy Fox Terriers

Aden Yoder’s kennel was a small barn about six feet wide and six feet long. It had a single doorway and two rows of indoor/outdoor cages. Each indoor and outdoor cage was about two feet wide, about a foot long, and about a foot high and made of treated wire. Metal doggie-doors allowed access from the indoor to the outdoor cages. The dogs inside the cages were each about eight to ten inches long. Two cages each contained one dog, while six cages each contained two dogs (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures).

The bottom cages were raised about two feet above the ground, with the top cages about six inches above them. A plastic sheet was set below the inside and outside rows of top cages to catch excrement. There was a massive accumulation of fecal matter below each row of outdoor cages (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). A plastic board below the top cages was sagging in the middle from the weight of the feces on it (3.1(c)(3)-Maintenance and replacement of surfaces) (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Inside the barn, there was a strong odor of excrement. Beneath the bottom cages was about a day’s accumulation of feces mixed with wood chips. Dark fecal stains were embedded into the wooden flooring below the cages.

The inside cages had plastic self-feeders attached to the cage walls and water spigots were directed into the cages themselves from piping that ran along the kennel walls. The walls inside the kennel were made of plastic sheeting, and below the cages these walls were covered in fecal stains (3.1(c)(2)-Maintenance and replacement of surfaces) (3.11(c)(3)-Cleaning)

Whelping pens
In addition, there were two whelping pens along a wall inside the barn, one pen positioned about two feet above the floor and the other positioned about six inches above it. Each pen consisted of a whelping box about a foot wide, two feet long, and a foot high, surrounded by caging. A doorway provided access to the cage. One pen contained a Toy Fox Terrier, and the other had a Chihuahua.

Similar to the cages previously described, the top whelping pen had a plastic sheet below it to catch feces, and the bottom pen had about a day’s accumulation of feces, mixed with wood chips, on the floor below it (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). Fecal stains covered the wooden floor below the bottom whelping pen. These pens also had water spigots and plastic self-feeders attached to the walls.

Yoder’s kennel, about 80 feet from Township Road 117, is visible from the road itself, as are its west-facing outside cages. He told the investigator on 4/8/05 that he had been in business for “exactly a year” and that he sells to the pet store Pet Pajamas.

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 19:41

Schwartz, Joseph and Irene - J & I Kennels

Approximately 50 dogs and 10 puppies. Breeds: Eskimos, Spitz, Poodles, Yorkshire Terriers, Maltese, Lhasa Apsos, Shih Tzu, Chihuahuas, Mixed-breeds

This kennel was contained in an indoor building about 30 feet wide and 40 feet long with a concrete flooring and metal siding on the walls. Access was provided by a single doorway, and several windows allowed sunlight into the kennel.

One side of the kennel had six cages set directly up against its wall, each about three feet long, two feet wide, and two feet high. The walls and roofs of the cages were made of untreated, thin-gauge metal wire (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures), with treated wire for flooring. These cages were raised about three feet above the floor on metal stilts. One cage contained a whelping Spitz mother about 18 inches long with several nursing puppies (3.6(c)(1)(i)(ii)-Primary enclosures) .

The fur on the underside of the Spitz mother was matted and stained (2.40-Vet Care). Her cage had a metal self feeder attached to one of its walls, a water dish on the floor, a plastic sheet covering a wall that adjoined an adjacent, empty cage, and a blanket that covered about half of the cage flooring. A plastic tray that was half the length of the cage was set below the cage to catch debris. Feces stains were evident on the concrete floor below the cage (3.6(c)(1)-Surfaces).

Another row of six cages was set against the same wall. Each was about 1.5 feet long, wide, and high and had untreated, thin-gauge wire walls and roofs (3.6(a)(2)(xii)-Primary enclosures) and treated wire flooring. One of these cages housed a Shih Tzu puppy about six-weeks-old. This cage had a metal self-feeder attached to one wall and a water dish on the floor.

Another of these cages housed two Chihuahuas, each about eight inches long (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures). Several bottles of medicine were stored on top of this cage.

A third cage contained a whelping Chihuahua about eight inches long, with four Chihuahua puppies about three weeks old and about four inches long (3.6(c)(1)(i)(ii)-Primary enclosures).

There was a row of about 15 cages in the middle of the kennel. Each cage had a metal enclosure, about four feet long, two feet wide, three feet high, and a plastic box about three feet long, two feet wide, and three feet high. There were connected by doggie-doors. The cage walls and roofs were made of thick-gauge, untreated, rusting wire (3.1(c)(1)(i)-Surfaces), and the flooring was made of untreated expanded metal. Each cage contained two to four dogs of various breeds, including Eskimos, Spitz, Poodles, Yorkshire Terriers, Maltese, Lhasa Apsos, Shih Tzu, and mixed breeds, each about 20 inches long (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures). More than a week’s accumulation of feces was below each cage (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures). One of the adult Poodle’s fur was full of thick mats (2.40-Vet care).

Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 19:40

Schlabach, Reuben - Sharp Run Kennels

No writtern report is available.
Published in Ohio
Wednesday, 25 July 2012 19:37

Schlabach, Reuben - Sharp Run Kennels

Approximately 110 dogs and 30 puppies. Breeds: Cairn Terriers, West Highland Terriers, Dachshunds, Poodles, Bichons, Pugs, Boston Terriers, and English Bulldogs

This kennel was housed in a cinderblock building, about 100 feet long and 40 feet wide. It had a peaked metal roof and concrete flooring. There were windows about two feet wide and three feet high that were spaced about every ten feet along the 100 foot walls. The kennel was accessible from the outside by a doorway that led directly to the kennel room. The owner indicated his facility was designed for raising hogs, and he had converted it to a dog kennel.

Inside there were two rows of seven dog pens that were positioned about five feet from the wall and about 10 feet apart. Each pen was about ten feet long and five feet wide. They had four-foot-high chain link walls and rubber mats for floorings. The cages in one row each housed an adult English Bulldog. Cages in the second row contained adult English Bulldogs and adult Boston Terriers.

A section of each pen was raised about 1.5 feet off the floor on wooden platforms. Wooden boards around these sections made it impossible to determine the amount of fecal accumulation inside the pens. All of the pens contained a water spigots secured to the chain link wall and fed from the ceiling through metal piping. Plastic food dishes were on the floor in a manner that did not minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding).

Other pens were arranged across the width of the building in two additional rows. There were about 20 pens in each row. Each pen was about ten feet long and three feet wide and had three-foot-high plastic walls, no roofs, and treated thick-gauge wire for floorings. There were one to three adult dogs of various breeds in each cage, including Pugs, Poodles, Bichons, West Highland Terriers, Dachshunds, Cairn Terriers, and Boston Terriers.

Several pens contained puppies of various ages, most less than two months old, and various breeds. In some of the puppy pens, there was carpet on the flooring. In some pens, up to five puppies were confined to a three-foot-square area covered with plastic sheeting and boarded off by one-foot-high wooden boards. These puppies weighed up to four pounds (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures).

Each cage was elevated a few inches above the floor. Recesses in the concrete under the cages were filled with stagnant water, feces, and urine. All of the pens had large patches – several days’ accumulation – of feces and fur stamped into the wire (3.11(a)-Cleaning of primary enclosures).

Water spigots ran into each pen from PVC piping, and plastic food dishes were positioned on the flooring of each pen in a manner that did not minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding).

All of the plastic boards and plastic walls in all of the pens had fecal stains on them (3.1(c)(3)- Surfaces).

Light fixtures were periodically placed about two feet above the pens. There were metal tubes containing wiring running from light to light and to the ceiling. The surfaces of the tubes, lights, and wooden trusses of the roof were covered in cobwebs and dust (3.1(c)(2)-Surfaces).

Published in Ohio
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