Kruse, Leroy and Gertrude

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Leroy and Gertrude Kruse
  • Owners: Kruse, Leroy and Gertrude
  • Address: 3389 Hickory Ave.
  • City, State Zip: Salem, IA 52649
  • Year: 2006
  • USDA License: 42-A-0181
  • Date of CAPS Investigation: 2006-09-11
  • Time of CAPS Investigation: 10:16


Kruse, Leroy and Gertrude
3389 Hickory Ave.
Salem, IA 52649
42-A-0181
CAPS investigation: 9/11/06; 10:16 a.m.

On the premises at the time of investigation: approximately 105 dogs and 25 puppies.

Breeds: Bichon Frises, Yorkshire Terriers, Pekingese

This facility had two buildings with elevated wire cages.

Breeder barn
The first barn had cages lining three walls, four sections of cages in the middle of the building, and a garage door on one side for access. Each section consisted of four cages, arranged adjacent to each other in a square configuration. All of the cages had treated wire floorings; some had treated-wire walls while others had walls of untreated wire and were rusting.

Many of the cages were overcrowded and had ceilings too low to allow six inches of space from the tops of the dogs’ heads to the tops of the cages (3.6(c)(1)(iii)-Primary enclosures).

While the cages were of various sizes, many contained two to three dogs that were too big for their cage space. For example, there was a cage about four feet long, 2.5 feet wide, and two feet high that contained a Pekingese and Bichon, each about 20 inches long from the tips of their noses to the bases of their tails – resulting in less than six inches of head room (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures); (3.6(c)(1)(iii)-Primary enclosures). Several cages were 2.5 feet long, wide, and high that each contained two Bichons 18 to 20 inches long (3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures).

Several cages were about 2.5 feet long and wide but only two feet high, each housing one to three Bichons. One lone Bichon had less than an inch of head room when it stood in a normal manner (3.6(c)(1)(iii)-Primary enclosures). Other cages of the same height housed two to three dogs that were each 18 to 20 inches long from the tips of their noses to the bases of their tails – allowing the dogs less than six inches of head room (3.6(c)(1)(iii); 3.6(c)(1)(i)-Primary enclosures).

Plastic bowls and metal cans on the floorings served as water and food dishes; however, the food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). Most of the metal cans that served as water bowls were rusty (3.10-Watering).

Cages in the back of the room were very difficult to see because the building was dark, despite sunlight coming through the windows (3.2(c)-Lighting).

A medicine table was at one corner of the barn near the entrance. A variety of bottled medicines were interspersed with a spray bottle, paint brushes, and a paint can. Open needles were lying on the table, and all of the contents were covered in dust (3.1(b)-Condition and site).

Whelping barn
The cages in the whelping barn were arranged similarly to those in the breeder barn, with about 20 elevated wire cages arranged along the walls and in the middle of the room. No lights were turned on in this building; despite sunlight coming in through windows, the cages were in darkness (3.2(c)-Lighting).

Most of the cages were 2.5 feet long and wide and less than two feet high, with two to three dogs per cage. Other cages contained nursing mothers with puppies or recently weaned puppies. The dogs were each 18 to 20 inches long and lacked six inches of head room. One of these cages housed a single Cocker Spaniel about two feet long from the tip of its nose to the base of its tail – allowing only about three inches of space from the top of the dog’s head to the top of the cage. Other cages only about 18 inches tall each housed two Yorkies that were 10 to 12 inches long. Many of these Yorkies lacked six inches of head room (3.6(c)(1)(i); 3.6(c)(1)(iii)-Primary enclosures).

Plastic bowls and metal cans on the floorings served as water and food dishes; however, the food dishes were not placed so as to minimize contamination by excreta (3.9(b)-Feeding). Most of the metal cans that served as water bowls were rusty (3.10-Watering).

Many of the cage walls were made of untreated wire and were covered in rust (3.1(c)(1)(i)-Surfaces).

A medicine table near the doorway of the building was covered with utility and medicinal supplies mixed together. It was covered in dust and stored within several feet of whelping cages (3.1(b)-Condition and site).

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